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SHAKESPEAREAN 



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VERBUM MEMORIALE 



RICHARD SHERMAN HUFF 
1898 — 1953 



"Your name from hence immortal life shall have." 

This Shakespearean issue of the "Mirror" is dedicated to Mr. Richard S. 
Huff, dynamic educator, ardent sportsman, and Headmaster of Waltham High 
School from 1948 until his sudden death in 1953. He will ever be remembered 
by his students for whom he worked so diligently. It was Mr. Huff who in- 
augurated Student Government, modernized our Guidance Department, se- 
cured a charter in the National Honor Society, and established more than a 
dozen clubs. This zealous headmaster worked industriously and devotedly to 
procure better scholarship assistance for Waltham High students. He once 
said that giving to one's school is giving to one's self, and that great value is 
derived from the work that is done with and for others. He had an alert, 
quick energetic mind. Indomitable was his spirit; earnest was his fairness; 
vibrant was his interest in those whom he counseled. In final tribute I should 
like to quote a verse written by the Bard of Avon more than two centuries ago: 

"His life was gentle; and the elements 
So mixed in him, that nature might stand up 
And say to all the world, 
'This was a Man! 

The Editor 



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WITHIN WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL, THE SCENE OF OUR DRAMA, DOTH LIE 

THE SENIORS, UNDERCLASSMEN AND STUDENTS: DRAMATIS PERSONAE. 

THE TIME OF THE PLAY IS THE PRESENT, THE ACTS NUMBER THREE. 

THE STORY IS A TRUE ONE, WE ARE SURE YOU WILL AGREE. 

THE ACADEMIC SIDE IS SHOWN, SO TOO THE SPORTS EVENTS 

THE CLUBS, STAFFS, COUNCIL, COMMITTEES, AND THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENTS. 

A PROMENADE, A HOCKEY GAME, A FORMER CLASSMATE'S FACE 

WHICH TIME AND THE ENSUING YEARS MAY HEEDLESSLY ERASE 

FROM YOUR MEMORY, WILL ONCE AGAIN BE RECALLED TO YOU 

BY GLANCING THROUGH THIS "MIRROR", A PLAY THAT IS ALWAYS NEW. 





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Staff 



EDITOR-IN CHIEF 

Ronald C. Brinn 

Acuity Advisor 
Mr. Wlhrd Smyth 



STAFF 
Mary Pendergast 

Jean Colangeio Angela Fanara 

Constance Neville > net Ohnemus 

David LeFort Leonard Johnson 

^iizabeth FrizzelJ Nancy Dederian 

Janet Walsh Francis Cusack 

Paul Fitzgibbon Joanne Walsh 

Pe ggy Denk Marion Nelson 

Neiiie ^ee Joan Barclay 

Ellen Dukat 

ART EDITORS 

Philip ReiUy 

Sandra Thomas Beverley Brynning 

Priscilia Scott 

^VSINESS MANAGER 

A ■ Jaddyn Ann Carpentino 

Assistant Manager 

Advertising Manager::; Donna Aucoin 

««**- Manager ^I.: ^ ;; Lo„ ^ ™ 

J°hn Gardiner 






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Thine eyes that taught the dumb on high to sing 
And heavy ignorance aloft to fly 
Have added feathers to the learncd's wing 
And given grace a double majesty." 



MR. JOHN W. McDEVITT 
Superintendent of School 




MR. EDWARD D. MAY, JR. 
Master 



MR. FRANCIS SHEEHEY 
Headmaster 







MR. HAROLD PRIDE 
Director of Trade School 



MISS GRACE L. WOODWARD 

Head of Business Department 

Director of Placement 



MR. LELAND CHAPMAN 
Director of Guidance 





MR. ALMON MORANG 
Submaster 



MR. RICHARD HOOD 
Submaster 




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Front Row: Miss Nolan, Business; 
Miss McCullough, History; Miss 
McGrath, English; Miss MacQuarrie. 
Business; Miss Leary, Business. Back 
Row: Mr. Husson, Business; Miss 
Madden, Clothing; Mr. Pettinati. 
Math; Miss Mooney, Business; Mr. 
Perkins, Science 



Front Row: Miss Geran, Head of 
Social Studies; Miss Frost, Phy. Ed.; 
Miss Devane, English. Mrs. Gabriel. 
Art; Miss Hirst, Science. Back Row: 
Mr. Garrahan, English; Mr. Elliott. 
Math; Miss Grover, Business; V 
Eaton, French; Miss Flagg, Business; 
Mr. Dwycr, English. 



'^4 




Front Row: Miss Fitch, Guidance; 
Mrs. Sparks, Sewing; Mrs. Sanford, 
Library; Miss Whitford, Languages; 
Miss Slattery, English. Second Row: 
Mr. Ryan, Social Studies; Miss Sew- 
all, Head of Physical Education for 
Girls; Miss Tahanney, Business; Mr. 
Smyth, Business; Mrs. Windsor, Eng- 
lish; Mr. Zullo, Math. 




MR. QUINN 

Trade 






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MR. ROACH 
English 




MISS BABB 
Cooking 




MR. LEARY 

Head of Physical Education 
for Boys 




MISS BLISS 
Head of Cooking 




MR. WOODMAN 
Business 




MR. FISHER 
Physical Education 



Front Row: Mrs. Carney, Social Stud- 
ies; Miss Darmedy, Social Studies; 
Miss Betts, Head of Languages; Miss 
Chase, Art. Back Row: Mr. Brain- 
ard, Science; Mr. Clark, Languages; 
Miss Coughlin, Nurse; Miss Balch, 
Business; Mr. Alfke, Guidance; Mr. 
Curry, Math. 



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SECRETARIES OF 
WALTHAM HIGH 

Mrs. Slamin, Miss Graceffa, Mrs. 
Lynch, Mrs. Kavaleski. 





WALTHAM TRADE FACULTY 

Front Row: Mr. Russell, Mr. Brucchi, 
Mr. Van Arsdale, Mr. Newman, Mr. 
Olding. Back Row: Mr. Westall, Mr. 
Hoyle, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Durling, 
Mr. Lehane. 



Left to Right: Mrs. Talanian, Secre- 
tary to the Superintendent; Miss 
Bornbeck, Stenographer to the Super- 
intendent; Miss Casella, Stenographer 
to the Superintendent; Mrs. Shelley, 
Stenographer to the Superintendent. 




11 



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ACT I 

SENIORS 



"What hath this day deserv'd? What hath it done. 
That it in golden letters should be set 
Among the high tides in the calendar?" 



BARBARA ABRUZZI 
Business 32 Spring St. 

"Diligence is the soul of success." 

Gang includes; Ann, Rose, and 
Tania . . . future plans; work in 
an office, get married . . . loves to 
skate and bowl . . . wills to 
W.H.S. her books and her mem- 
ories. 




WILLIAM ADAMS 

College 8 Derby St. 

"So many hours must 
I take my rest . . ." 

Plans to go to college after grad- 
uation ... be a success in all 
phases of life . . . wills his private 
gum machine to all the future 
pupils of Miss Betts . . . friends 
include; Rusty, Ralph, and the 
U.B.I. . . . liked the faculty of 
W.H.S. 

Hockey 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; 
Tech Club 2, 3; Dramatic Club 4. 




ANTHONY ANNUNZIATA 

Business 84 Albemarle Rd. 

"Let each man do his best." 

After graduation, enter the service 
. . . ambition, make a career in the 
army . . . can be seen puttering 
around in his car. 
Football 2, 3, 4. 





ALVIN ARSENAULT 

General 109 Chestnut St. 

"The world makes way for a 

determined man." 

Hopes to work as an electrician's 
apprentice after graduation . . . 
ambition to become a real elec- 
trician . . . W.H.S. memories; 
the gals, . . . best buddies, Jim 
Fred, and Dick. 



ROSE ARENA 

Business 15 Noonen St. 

"A rose by any other name 

would smell as sweet." 

After graduation, plans to be a 
clerical worker . . . ambition, 
visit Virginia . . . leaves to Miss 
Grover a year of good seniors 
. . . biggest thrill at W.H.S. was 
seeing Danny before school. 
Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Mardi 
Gras Rep. 





DIANE ARSENAULT 
Business 122 Calvary St. 

"A bright and shining light." 
Plans to be a secretary after 
leaving W.H.S. . . . wills to 
Sylvia all her books . . . friends, 
Rosanna, and Joan. 




14 



NANCY C. BAILEY 

College 439 Lexington St. 

"For she is wise, 

and fair she is." 

After graduation, Junior college 
. . . ambition, marriage . . . 
enjoyed summer vacations most 
. . . wills relief from cafeteria 
duty to Miss Betts . . . friends, 
"Phiddy" Underwood and Joan. 
National Honor Society 3, 4; 
Hockey cheerleader 2; Dramatic 
Club 2, 3, 4. 




ROBERT BALL 

Business 98 Thornton Rd. 

". . . and I have seen the 

ambitious ocean swell and 

rage and foam." 
Wants to join the navy ... no 
ambition . . . after four years 
he'll decide . . . Cedarwood boy 
. . . wills Miss Leary a quiet 
homeroom . . . favorite pals; 
George, Armand, . . . likes 
study periods and lunch (don't 
we all). 



JOAN BARCLAY 

College 287 Grove St. 

"A day in April never 

came so sweet." 

Plans to attend State Teacher's 
College after graduation . . . 
hopes to teach elementary grades 
. . . chums: Angie, Ginny, and 
Lennie . . . wills to W.H.S. 
teachers some double barrelled 
six shooters. 

Drama Club 3, 4; Art Club 2; 
Business Staff of Mirror 2, 3; 
Literary 3, 4; Girls' Sports 2, 3, 
4; Senior Dance Committee. 







JAMES BARNES 

General 78 Cushing St. 

"An affable and courteous 

gentleman." 

Plans to sail the ocean blue after 
graduation . . .later become an 
architect . . . buddies, Dick and 
the boys of Lakeview . . . Mem- 
oirs . . . W.H.S. girls . . . wills to 
Miss Betts every book in W.H.S. 
Rifle Club 3, 4. 




JEANETTE BARNES 

Business 78 Cushing St. 

"In each cheek appears a 
pretty dimple." 

Plans to work in Telephone Co. 
or an office after graduation . . . 
friends, Betty, Joan, and Don 
. . . ambition is to get married. 
Commercial Club 4. 





ARLENE BARTLETT 

Business 53 Newton St. 

"One out of many." 

Friendly Arlene likes bombing 
around in Shirl's car . . . leaves 
to the juniors her typing papers 
. . . after graduation wants to 
work in an office. 
Knitting Club 2, 3, 4; Commer- 
cial Club 4; Girls' Sports. 



MARY ANN BARILLE 

Business 6 Parker Lane 

"Women are never at a 
loss for words." 

"May" liked assemblies best at 

W.H.S. . . . always seen with 

Ellie . . . after graduation wants 

to be a secretary. 

Mirror Representative, Football 

Usher. 






CHARLOTTE BASLE 

Business 11 Rockridge Rd. 

"To business that we love." 

Career as a secretary after grad- 
uation is what she plans . . . 
leaves Jessie her glasses . . . 
liked best at W.H.S. the crowded 
halls and cafeteria . . . can be 
seen with Jessie and Betty. 
F.H.A. Club. 




JOAN BEATON 

Business 95 Lake St. 

"Steepest or wakest thou." 

A cheerleader . . . likes W.H.S. 
Football Team (who doesn't) 
. . . friends, Diane, and Shirley. 
Cheerleader 3, 4; Vice-president 
Senior Class. 




HENRY BEAUDET 
Business 27 Dale St. 

"//<• trod the itJtcr. whose 
enmity he flung aside . . 

Plans to join the navy, see the 
world . . . then become a C.P.A. 
. . . wills to a junior his marks 
. . . liked study periods and 
Larry. 

Hockey 2 



15 



LAWRENCE BEER 

College 234 Main St. 

"He was a scholar, and a 
ripe and good one." 

Wills to Miss Betts a sound- 
proof room . . . always will re- 
member our football teams . . . 
plans Northeastern or Williams 
. . . ambition is a job on the 
waterfront . . . buddies are Henry, 
Dick, and Roger. 
Art Club 2, 3, 4. 




RAYMOND BELL 
College 184 Lexington St. 

"To climb steep hills requires 
slow pace at first." 
Wills his knowledge of French 
to Miss Betts . . . liked best was 
playing hockey most of the time 
. . . ambition is engineering . . . 
pals Dick, Frank. 
Hockey 2, 3, 4; Tech Club 4; 
Baseball 2; Football 2. 




JOAN BENINATI 
Business 6 Calvary St. 

". . . as merry as the day is long." 

Wills to Miss Mooney her short 
hand notebook . . . hopes to work 
in an office after graduation r\ . 
ambition is to be a private sec- 
retary . . . pals are Shirley, Ruth, 
and Barbara. 

Drama Club 2, 3; Commercial 
Club 4; Girls' Sports 2, 3, 4. 





ROBERT BENJAMINSON 

Business 35 Nathan Rd. 

"Some are horn great." 

Monitor on first floor . . . pals 
are Bill, Fred, and Rork . . . am- 
bition is to become a commer- 
cial pilot in the Air Force. 
Homeroom Legislator 3; Moni- 
tor 3, 4. 



SHIRLEY BENINATI 

Business 4 Calvary St. 

"We the globe can 
compass soon . . ." 

Wills Frances Salamone all the 
typing she has done at W.H.S. 
pals include Barbara and Ann 
. . . liked the lunch period best 
. . . ambition to work in an of- 
fice to finance trip around the 
world. 

Drama Club 2, 3; Commercial 
Club 4. 




RENE J. BERARD 

College 28 Reyem St. 

". . . And by the bright track of 

hit fiery car, gives signal of a 

goodly day tomorrow." 

Ambition to attend University of 
Mass. . . . the considerate facul- 
ty and friendly students ranked 
high with him . . . pals are Bill, 
Jim, and Ronnie . . . hopes to 
make medicine or Navy his ca- 
reer. 

Tech Club 3, 4; Senior Class 
Treasurer. 





LORRAINE M. BERGANTINO 

Business 9 Oak St. 

"And love is loveliest . . ." 

Ambition to work in a bank, get 
married and have a dozen chil- 
dren . . . pals are Mary, Janet, 
and Mary Mula . . . wills to the 
class of "55" the teachers to en- 
joy. 

Knitting Club 2; Commercial 
Club 4; Girls' Sports 2. 



16 




EDWARD BISSON 

General 9 Coolidge Ave. 

"// money go before, 

all ways do lie open." 

Humorous Ed plans to open a 
cleaning business for himself . . . 
pals are Tom, Dennis, and Dick 
. . . wills to 201 a new desk . . . 
ambition to be a millionaire. 



SANDRA BLOMBERG 
College 234 Ash St. 

"Yet marked I where the bolt 

of Cupid tell." 
Friends are Louise, Bleachy, and 
Bobby . . . ambition to marry a 
millionaire . . . W.H.S. Memoir; 
fact that you never know what 
will happen next . . . wills her 
allergy pills to Mr. Dwyer . . . 
to enter a secretarial shool next 
fall. 
Knitting Club 4. 




LOUISE BOMENGAN 
College 126 Brown St. 

"Thy eternal summer 
shall not fade." 
Plans after graduation . . . Col- 
lege . . . Iked the study periods 
at W.H.S. the best . . . friends 
are Sandy, Bleachy, and Bobby. 
Drama Club 2; Knitting Club 3, 
4; Mirror Representative 4. 




JOAN BOND 
Business 54 Chesterbrook Rd. 
". . . to serve, love, and obey." 
Ambition ... to be married . . . 
liked dances at W.H.S. the best 
. . . wills to Miss Mooney her 
shorthand notebooks . . . Partners 
in merriment are Betty, Nancy, 
and Phil . . . after graduation 
will work in an office. 
Drama Club 2; Hockey Cheer- 
leader 2; Commercial Club 4. 




\\ 



CAROL A. BORGES 
Business 285 Newton St. 

"If I could number 
your graces . . ." 
After graduation . . . Dental 
School to study Dental hygiene 
. . . liked the Proms and Senior 
Play best at W.H.S. . . . always 
seen with Judy and Bette . . . 
wills to all the sophs and juniors, 
her long waiting in the lunch 
line. 

Knitting Club 2; Commercial 
Club 4; Business Staff of Mirror 
4; Newspaper 3, 4. 



THOMAS BONICA 

General 120 College Farm Rd. 

"Smooth runs the water . . ." 

Tom's W.H.S. memoirs are the 
girls . . . ambition . . . electrician 
. . . wills to W.H.S. all the gold 
in his teeth. . . pals are Dennis, 
Bisson, and Ed . . . will soon be 
in the Navy but hopes to further 
his education on discharge. 





RAYMOND BOWLBY 
Business 6 Brown's Ave. 

''Turning the accomplishment 
of many years." 
Plans to be a biologist some day 
but work immediately after grad- 
uation ... he really appreciated 
the small amount of home work 
the teachers gave? . . . leaves his 
books to next year's seniors . . . 
enjoys hunting and fishing in his 
spare time. 




BETTY BOYD 

Business 57 Seminole Ave. 

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle 

and low. an excellent thing 

in a woman." 

Plans to work in an office after 
graduation . . . get married . . . 
live in Canada . . . wills to class 
of "55" all school books . . . 
chums include Lorraine, Char- 
lotte, and Jessie. 




DENNIS BREAULT 
General 659 Trapelo Rd. 

li isdom and Fortune combating 

to get lu '." 

Greatest ambition is to get ■ good 

paying job . . . liked the good 

training offered at \\ 1 1 S ... 
wills to 201 a new cushion for 
his chair . . . Buddies include: 
Eddie, Tom, and Bob . . . Future 
plans . . . U. S. Air Forn- 



17 



JOSEPH BRENNAN 
General 561 South St. 

"Hare we marched on without 
impediments." 
After graduation a stretch in the 
armed forces . . . liked the lunch 
period ... Ed and Tony are his 
pals . . . wills his physics book 
to the science department. 
Rifle Club 2. 




RONALD BRINN 
College 35 Murray St 

"There's a time for all things." 
Our busy editor wants to make 
writing his career after gradua- 
tion from Tufts . . . "W.H.S. 
Memoirs": three wonderful years. 
President of N.H.S. 4, Class Presi- 
dent 2; Dance Committee 2, 3, 4; 
Executive Council 2, 4; Junior 
Prom Committee; Associate Edi- 
tor of Mirror 2, 3; Senior Dance 
Committee; Hockey 2, 3, 4; 
Editor-in-chief Mirror 4. 




DONNA BROWN 

Home Ec. 127 Woerd Ave. 

"Let gentleness thy strong 
enforcement be." 

Would like to work as an appren- 
tice dressmaker . . . liked proms, 
posture classes in gym . . . football 
games. 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4. 




WILLIAM BUEHLER 
College 18 Beal Rd 

"Jesters do often prove prophets." 

The clocks that never are on time 
are Bill's favorite at W. H. S. . . . 
plans include going to accounting 
school . . . wills to Mr. Sheehy a 
good senior class . . . buddies; 
Tony and Bob. 




BEVERLY BRYNING 

College 14 Woerd Ave. 

"Her beauty hangs upon the 

cheek of night." 

Wills to Mrs. Gabriel a box of 
thumb tacks . . . future plans; to 
attend art school . . . girl friends; 
Sandy and Marilyn. 
National Honor Society 3, 4; Se- 
nior Dance Committee; Yearbook 




ANTHONY BUSCI 
General 234 River St. 

"Flout 'em and scout 'em." 

Athletic Tony plans a stretch with 
the armed forces after graduation 
. . . his goal ... to become a 
state policeman . . . wills to Miss 
Betts his friendship . . . partners 
in crime are Ed, Don, and Joe. 
Football 3, 4. 




18 



GERALD R. CAIL 
College 11 Manor Rd. 

"To sleep, perchance to dream." 
Wills W.H.S. a new cafeteria . . . 
future plans . . . engineering 
school . . . prefers mechanical en- 
gineering . . . lunch is favorite 
period . . . friends; Dave, Segur, 
and others rodders. 




ROSEANNA CAISSIE 
Business 42 Oak St. 

"Till o'er their brows, 
sleep doth creep." 
Memories . . . football games, 
teachers, and assemblies . . . post 
graduation plans . . . continue 
working at Slumberland Products 
followed by a job as a stenogra- 
pher . . . friends include Diane 
and Grace. 






JUDITH CAMPBELL 
Home Ec. 22 McKenn St. 

"To seric. love and oh, 

Woukl like Miss Madden to have 
a few clever students . . . work a 
few years and marriage are future 
plans . . . friends . . . Donna, 
Betty, and Shirley. 






t 

V 




CAROLYN CAMP!' 
College I Everett St. 

"fairness which strikes the eye." 
Future plans . . . attend a school 
of practical arts . . . ambition . . . 
to be a commercial artist, marry a 
millionaire . . . favorite expres- 
sion; "Wait for me, Gus!" . . . 
Friends include Alice, Naomi, and 
Joan. 





VIRGINIA CAMPISI 

College 79 Barbara Rd. 

"Constant you are, but yet a 

woman." 

Memories of W.H.S. include the 
teachers, classmates, social life . . . 
future plans . . . Regis or Boston 
University . . . friends include 
Joan, Mary Lou and Sandy. 
Senior Dance Committee. 



ELAINE 



CARD 
College 15 Dexter St. 

"Thou dost beguile the world." 

Wiffie would like to be a medical 
secretary after graduation from 
junior college or business school 
. . . wills Miss Betts a gum only 
basket . . . remembers most the 
two minute dashes between class- 
es .. . gang members; Lorraine, 
Shirlie, and Fay. 

Photo Club 2; Business Staff of 
Mirror 3, 4. 




EDWARD CAPPADONA 
General 18 Fuller St. 

"Serve always with assured trust." 
Member of football team . . . 
plans tour of duty with the army^ 
following graduation . . . cohorts 
in crime include Don and Tony. 
Football 2, 3, 4. 

JACKLYN CARPENTINO 

Business 161 Grove St. 

"What thou wilt, thou shall 
in force it with thy smile." 

This vivacious member of the 
stenographic course would like to 
attend the Academie Moderne . . . 
Mr. Sheehy tops her list of 
W.H.S. favorites . . . friends in- 
clude Nancy, Judy, Angie, and 
Lorraine. 

Legislator 2; Girls Vice President 
3, 4; Executive Council 3, 4; Mir- 
ror 3, 4; Business Manager 4; 
Monitor 3, 4; Newspaper Staff 3; 
Senior Dance Committee. 




FRED CARROLL 
General 103 Villa St. 

"Ever) man will be thy friend." 
Post graduation . . . would like 
to further outstanding ability by 
attending art school ... he espe- 
cially remembers the general con- 
dition of the lunch room . . . 
partners in crime arc Patsy, Mel- 
vin, and Bob. 




ERVENE CARTER 

Business 92 Bright St. 

"llcr gentle spirit" 

Ervenc plans to work in an office 
. . . best remembers the wonder- 
ful proms and .Ktion-rillcd I 

ball games , . , among her friends 
an- feao and Marie. 
Waliham High School Band 

4: Knitting Club \. \ 



19 



MELVIN CASEY 
General 54 Myrtle Street 

"With eager feeding food- 
doth choke the feeder." 
The battles he had to go through 
to get to lunch stand out in his 
memories of W.H.S. . . . would 
like to take up drafting after a 
tour of duty with the army . . . 
thinks Miss Betts should have his 
report card . . . best pal is Fred 
Carroll. 
Rifle Club 3, 4. 





JEAN CASWELL 

Business 95 Albermarle Road 

"I will be correspondent to 

command." 

Future plans . . . good bookkeep- 
er .. . liked the dances . . . wills 
to the sophomores her sales books. 
Commercial Club 4. 



ROBERT CASELLA 
Trade 157 Winter Street 

"Speak less than thou knouest." 
Popular Bob's pals include Paul 
and Shorty . . . hopes to work in 
the trade building . . . wills Paul 
a coffin . . . Ambition . . . contrac- 
tor .. . likes hot rods and skiing. 




OMAS CAVANAUGH 



221 Lowell Street 
; to be honest, as this 



Trade 

"Aye, 

world goes is to be one picked out 

of ten thousand." 
Plans to go into business for him- 
self . . . enjoyed shoveling the 
walks of W.H.S. . . . member of 
the Trade School basketball team 
. . . pals are George Murphy, Ray 
Dion and "Red" Jones. 




C^K 



MICHAEL CATALDO 
College 103 Irving Street 

"From the crown of his head to 
the sole of his foot 
he is all mirth." 
Mike "Ace" Cataldo hopes to at- 
tend college to become a success! 
Best pals are Rene Berard, Billy 
Adams and Ronnie Brinn . . . 
wills some young teachers to 
W.H.S. . . . memoirs - ■ Mr. 
Sheehy. 
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3- 




) 




Co 

MARIE CHICCO 

Business 25 Williams Street 

"Merrily, merrily shall 
I live now." 
Marie plans to work in an office 
as a general clerk . . . liked Mr. 
Hood's English Classes . . . wills 
to Joanne, all her homework. 
Commercial Club 4; Music Club 
3. 




DOROTHY CINCOTTA 
Business 292 River Street 

"Our foster nurse of nature 
is repose." 
Dot hopes to become a private 
secretary ... her highlights were 
the football team and Junior Eng- 
lish with Mr. Hood . . . seen 
mainly with Carol, Marie, and 
Marylou. 
Commercial Club 4. 



20 




DANIEL CLASBY 
General 130. Adams Street 

"They laugh that win." 
After graduation Dan plans to go 
to night school . . . friends in- 
clude Dick, Bus, Eddie, and Cliff 
. . . wills to Mr. Ryan his new 
painting stick. 



JEAN M. COLANGELO 
College 20 Cleveland Road 

"Of such a merry nimble spirit." 
Jean plans to attend the University 
of Mass. . . . ambition ... to be- 
come an English teacher . . . liked 
best at W.H.S. the football games, 
study halls, and algebra with 
H.G.P. . . . fellow partners in 
crime . . . Fay, Andrea, Franny, 
and Lanie . . . wills to Mr. Pet- 
tinati "all her credit." 
Class Secretary 2; Sec. of News- 
paper Column 4; Editorial Staff of 
Mirror 4; Hockey Cheerleader 3. 




ANDREA COLLINS 
College 76 Rockridge Road 

"/ have no superfluous leisure.' 
After graduation . . . Boston Col 
lege or Regis . . . ambition . . 
to see the world . . . friends . . 
Sybil, Jean, Fay . . . W.H.S 
memoirs . . . football games, stu- 
dy halls and girls sports . . . wills 
a room at a hotel for the proms 
to W.H.S. 

Newspaper Staff 3, 4; Girls sports 
2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2. 




GEORGE COLUCCI 

College 25 Dennison Street 

"So many hours must 1 
contemplate." 

George, our future representative 
to the Coast Guard Academy plans 
engineering as a profession . . . 
to his favorite teacher, George 
leaves a much needed wrist watch. 
Tech Club 3, 4; Art Club 3, 4; 
Monitor 4; Mirror Business Staff 
4. 



GRACE COLLURA 

Business 25 Oak Street 

"As Nature was in making 
'graces dear'." 

Wants to be a good stenographer 
after graduation . . . liked best 
the teachers and the football 
games . . . pals are Roseanna, 
Mary, Ann. 

F.H.A. Club 2, 3; Commercial 
Club 4; Graduation and Class Day 
Usher 3. 




"N, 



DONALD COOK 

College 47 Vernon Street 

"Many can brook the ueather that 

cannot love the Wind." 

Donald plans to attend the U. S. 
Merchant Marine Academy . . . 
enjoyed everything about W.H.S. 
. . . pals are Fred Corcoran and 
Lee Webster. 
Rifle Club 4. 




FREDERICK CORCORAN 

College 58 Fiske Avenue 

"Mine eye and heart are at a 

mortal war . . ." 

ed's ambition is to be a mem- 
ber of the glorious corps . . . 
plans to attend Holy Cross . . . 
liked everything about W.H.S. 
. . . pals include Skippy Williams 
and Doug Petipas. 
Rifle Club 2. 




LEON A CORMIER 

Business 755 Lincoln Street 

'To do a great right, 

a little wrong." 

After graduation . . . marry Gerry 
and help him to become a general 
. . . enjoyed the mixture of courses 
at W.H.S. . . . pals are Joan, 
Susan, and Helen. 
Field Hockey 2; Dramatic Club 
3; Football Usher 3, 4. 





JAMES CORNWELL 
College 50 Clements Road 

"An upright judge, 
a 1 ear in J mJgc." 
Ambition is to be an engineer, 
after attending MIT. . . . seen 
most often with George, Will. 
Dick . . . e njo y e d Mr. Petinarti's 

wonderful disposition . . . wills 
to Fred Howell his job as scrap- 
ing dishes in the cafeteria 
Radio Club 2; Projection Staff 2. 
i; Tech Club 3. 4; Science 
Fair v Home Room Legislator 4; 
Library 4; Cafeteria Worker 4; 
Monitor 4. 



JAMES COTONI 

General 2 Emery St. 

"/ do desire we may be 

better strangers." 

Jim plans to attend college . . . 
ambition is to be an engineer . . . 
liked the math teachers at W.H.S. 
. . . wills to Mr. Brainard his 
empty seat . . . chums with Dan 
Clasby. 






JOHN CROSSETTE 
College 1 1 Marlton Rd. 

"Fearless minds climb soonest 
unto crowns." 
Tall, dark, and handsome Jay's 
destination is Boston College . . . 
W.H.S. memoirs: the quiet phys- 
ics classes . . . ambition is to be 
a genius . . . best pals Rusty 
Cusack and the boys . . .Headed 
fon the armed services. 




Ambition 



CUSACK 



College ) 10 Woerd Avenue 

"Fortune is merry, and in this 
mood will give us anything." 

is to hear opportunity 
knock . . . Northeastern after 
graduation ... A set of traffic 
lights to Miss Gearan. Pals, are 
the members of the U.B.I, and 

Debating Club 2; 
4; Literary Staff of 



the C.R.W.R. 
Basketball 2; 
Tech. Club 3, 
the Mirror 4. 



^^ 




c^\\ 



LEANOR DEAGLE 

Business 188 Hammond St. 

'In faith, lady, you have a 
merry heart." 

Ellie remembers . . .elevator in 
W.H.S. . . . wills shorthand note- 
book to next year's lucky class . . . 
partners Ernie, Nellie, and Betsy. 
Ambition to be a good secretary. 
Band 4; Glee Club 2. 



DONALD CUSANO 

General 16 Underwood Pk. 

"The dauntless spirit of 
resolution." 

Don plans to enter the armed 
forces after graduation from 
W.H.S. . . . memoirs . . . the girls 
at W.H.S. . . . Don's pals . . . 
Dick, Ed, Tony, Cliff. 
Football 2, 3; Junior Prom Chair- 
man. 



v»^ 



( 



•; 




ROBERT DEARBORN 

General 230 Charles St. 

"Enjoy the honey-heavy dew 
of slumber." 

Bob plans army life and college 
on the G.I. bill. Favorite expres- 
sion . . . "What do you think of 
that" . . . Pals . . . Bill, Vinnie 
. . . W.H.S. Memories ... all his 
wonderful teachers. 




DONALD DELANEY 

General 1 Music Hall Ave. 

"Sky aspiring and ambitious 
thoughts." 

W.H.S. Memories . . . sports, 
dances, and main dish . . . Future 
plans . . . save money for col- 
lege . . . Buddies, Don and Bill 
. . . ambition a commercial ad- 
vertiser. 
Mirror Rep. 3; Photo Club 2. 



22 




RONALD 

Business 1 

"A good heart 
Wills to W.H.S. 



DELANEY 
Music Hall Ave. 
is mostly gold." 
. . . all text books 



. . . Future plans . . . Navy . . . 
Pals . . . Bill, Ray, Dave, and 
Tom . . . Ron remembers W.H.S. 
. . . best school he could attend. 



PEGGY ANN DENK 
College 26 Farnum Rd. 

"A comfortable humor that tickles 

as it scratches." 
Ambition to see the world . . . 
future plans B. U. . . . W.H.S. 
Memoir . . . the elevators? Peg's 
colleagues . . . Gail, Marion, Mari- 
lyn, and Jackie. 




ELIZABETH DENT1NO 
Business 40 Elson Rd. 

"Thoughts are winged." 
After graduation Betty hopes to 
work as a bookkeeper . . . W.H.S. 
Memoir . . . the girls' sports . . . 
Her ambition is to be a Certified 
Public Accountant and then mar- 
riage. 
Commercial Club 4; Glee Club 3. 





NANCY DEDERIAN 

College 45 Barbara Rd. 

"Activity and sadness are 
incompatible." 

Nancy's partners in mirth . . . 
Betty and Nellie . . . Future plans 
to attend Colby or Middlebury 
College. 

National Honor Society 3, 4; 
Literary Staff of Mirror 3, 4; Col- 
umn Staff 3, 4; Mirror Business 
Staff 2; Honor Roll 2, 3; Debat- 
ing Club President 4; Monitor 3, 
4; Librarian 2,4. 

WILLIAM DOCHERTY 
General 4 Beal Rd. 

"Faint heart ne'er won fair Lady." 

"Doc'' wills to his best pal Bill 
a certain new schedule . . . Other 
buddies . . . Dick, Dan, Cliff . . . 
Future plans . . . college . . . 
W.H.S. Memoirs ... his wonder- 
ful homeroom teacher . . . Ambi- 
tion . . . airplane pilot. 
Rifle Club 2. 







ELIZABETH DEVANY 
Home Economics 60 Turner St. 
"Since once I heard a Mermaid." 

Betty's partner in mischief . . . 
Michelle . . . W.H.S. Memoir 
. Miss Gearan's democracy class 
. after graduation Betty hopes 
to be a telephone operator . . . 
She wills W.H.S. some more in- 
ustrious cafeteria workers. 



^fa 



MARY LOU DONNELLY 

College 44 Clements Rd. 

"The grass stoops not. She treads 
on it so light." 

Mary Lou's colleagues . . . Ginny, 
Jody and all the Pente girls of 
whom she is President . . . Fu- 
ture plans . . . college and ele- 
mentary school teaching . . . 
W.H.S. Memoir . . . the active 
social life and every day. 
Hockey Cheerleader 3, 4; Column 
Staff; Knitting Club 2; Drama 
Club 4; Business Mirror Staff 3. 







PAUL DUNKLEE 

College IS Russell Street 

"For some must watch, 
while some must sleep." 

Pauls future plans include college 
and marriage ... he wills to the 
school one dozen responsible pu- 
pils to clean up the "cafe'' after 
every lunch . . . W.H.S. Memoirs 
. . . the "Guys" and "Gals" that 
make the school a good one. 
Photography Club 2, 4; Drama 
Club 3. 




BARBARA DUPAE 
Home Ec. SI Russell Street 

"/ have bought golden opinions 
from all sorts of pi 

"Bub" plans to become ■ tele- 
phone operator titer graduation 

. . . WHS Memoirs . . . all the 

football emus . . . partners in 
mirth . . . Betty Jean, Louise, 
T.ini.i . . Barb wills Mr. Alike 
.i dictionary oi "Gobbledy Gook." 



23 



STUART EASTMAN 

College 14 Bedford Street 

'There's place and means 

for every man alive." 
College and the armed forces 
promise to play a part in Stu's 
future plans ... he plans to get 
a military commission . . . W.H.S. 
Memoir: The ample space in the 
cafeteria at lunch periods. 
Rifle Club 4. 





WARREN EDWARDSON 
Trade 435 Lincoln 

"Are you good men and true?" 
"Shorty" . . . likes Trade School 
. . . member of Carpentry Course 
... he plans to work on a ranch 
. . . favorite saying, "Pretty 
shrewd". May be seen with Paul, 
Bob, Jim. 



MHHHB 




THOMAS EMBERLEY 
College 71 Exchange St. 

"A kinder gentleman treads not 
the earth." 
Terrific Tommy wills to future 
classes "All A" report cards . . . 
best buddies; Ralph, Rusty and 
the rest of the U.B.I.'s . . . Future 
plans . . . join the Navy or obtain 
a good job . . . W.H.S. memories; 
the dances and parties. Tom's am- 
bition; to live a life of leisure. 








NANCY FAGE 
Business 7 Mayall Road 

"Beauty lives with kindness." 
After graduation "Nanc" hopes 
either to work in a large office or 
to go to business school . . . am- 
bition is to ride in a good car . . . 
W.H.S. Memories ... the large 
lockers and a certain person. 



MARILYN FARRAR 
College 82 Marianne Rd. 

"Mischief, thou art afloat." 
Quiet "Mai" plans to go to college 
after graduation, probably U. of 
Mass. . . . ambition is to play 
shortstop for the Dodgers . . . 
W.H.S. memories ... the dances 
every month . . . partners in mis- 
chief . . . San, Phiddy, and Sandy. 
Knitting Club 2; Dramatic Club 
3, 4; Mid Year Mirror 3; Red 
Cross Rep. 2. 




JOAN ERIKSON 
Business 27 South Street 

"I have no precious time at all 

to spend." 
Plans to work as a private secre- 
tary . . . pals are Ann, Shirley, 
and Jean . . . wills to Miss Mooney 
a new stop watch for dictation 
. . . lunch with all the kids was 
the highlight of her years as a 
W.H.S. student. 




) ^ 




ANGELINA FANARA 
Business 110 Bright Street 

"Then there is mirth in Heaven." 
Plans include working in a bank 
. . . popular "Angie" hopes to be 
a medical secretary . . . likes the 
friendliness between the teachers 
and students . . . friends are Joan, 
Shirl, and Wiffy. 
Girls Sports 3, 4; Debating Club 
2, 3, 4; Debate Chairman 2, 3; 
Room Legislator 4; Senior Dance 
Committee; Mirror Staff 4; Mirror 
Business Staff 3. 




^ 



^ 





Zs 



£^' JOHN FARRELL 
College 15 Lyman Terrace 

"He was nor sad nor merry." 
Plans to attend college after grad- 
uation . . . ambition is to be an 
engineer . . . wills to Mr. Hood 
a writing machine . . . buddies 
include Dave, Ralph, Bill, Rene, 
and Archie. 
Hockey 3, 4. 



ROBERT FAY 
Business L42 High Street 

"Each man has his on n place." 
Bob plans to enter business career 
school . . . studies and lunch rate 
high with him . . . can be seen 
with Bill, Larry, and Ben. 
Baseball 2, 3, 4. 




ADRIAN FEELEY 
Business 36 Cedar Street 

"Carry on in quiet earnestness." 
Business school is Adrian's des- 
tination after graduation . . . 
Would like to be an accountant 
. . . wills to some lucky student 
all his books . . . Often seen with 
Tom, Luciano, and Buddy. 
Art Club 2. 




CLIFFORD FENTON 
General 346 Cresent Street 

"Sigh no more, ladies, 
sigh no more." 
Good looking Cliff plans to work 
in a gas station until Uncle Sam 
comes a-calling . . . ambition is 
to make a good week's pay ... all 
the quiet girls of WHS. rate 
highly with him . . . can often be 
seen with Jim, Genoa, Don. 





c^. 1 



PAUL FITZGIBBON 

College 752 Beaver Street 

"/;; secret toil all forwards 
do contend." 

Plans to go to college, but unde- 
cided as to which one . . . wills 
to Miss Betts a Napoleon who 
will get "A" in French . . . lunch 
rates highly in Fitzie's book . . . 
Pals include Czar Brinn, Lennie, 
Rusty, Ralph, Tom, Billy, Dave. 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 
4; Dramatic Club 4. 



JOHN FERRERA 
College 30 Calvary Street 

"Jesters do often prove prophets." 
Looks forward to going to Mari- 
time Academy . . . W.H.S. me- 
moirs . . . The meeting of differ- 
ent personalities . . . Ambition is 
to be a successful engineer . . . 
Buddies include Bernie, Jack, 
ramatic Club 2, 



) 




DAVID W. FLANNERY 

23 Porter Road 
every man be master 
of his time." 
Plans to become an electrician 
after two years of electrical school 
. . . wills all his books to Ed 
Pomphrett . . . seems that he likes 
girls at W.H.S. . . . can be seen 
with his buddies, Chuck, Dick, 
Bob, Ed, Dick. 




MARY LOU FLYNN 
Business 7 Sharon Street 

"Sleep dwell upon thine eyes." 
Mary Lou plans to go on to school 
desires to be 
, . . lunch is 
. partners in 
Marie, Carol, 



after graduation . 
a private secretary 
tops with her . . 
mirth . . . Dottie, 



and Louie. 

Girls Sports 2, 3, 4; Dramatic 

Club 4; Commercial Club 4. 




WILLIAM FORD 

Business 51 Willow Street 

"And we must take the current 

when it S9TV9S, or lose our 

! i >::w. 

Wills to the high school his corre- 
spondence book . . . girls seem to 
be his interest . . . It's the Navy 
for Bill after graduation . . . 
among his pals are Buddy, Dick, 
and Bob. 

Basketball | 



25 



ARMAND FOSKIN 

Business 31 Middle St. 

"The ladies call him sweet." 

Armand desires to be a draftsman 
. . . plans to attend a technical 
school after graduation . . . 
W.H.S. memoirs . . .the teachers 
. . . wills to the Gustin's a Hot-36- 
. '. . buddies include Dick, Tony, 
Monk, Jim, and Hal. 




WILLARD E. FRAIZE 

College 38 Brown St. 

"From his cradle 
he was a scholar." 

Plans to attend Northeastern or 
M.I.T. after graduation . . . de- 
sires to be a mechanical engineer 
. . . Mr. Pettinati's mechanical 
drawing class . . . rates highly 
with him . . . wills to Mr. Craw- 
ford 15 studies per week for 
orchestra rehearsals . . . pals with 
Dick, Jim, John, George, and 
Paul. 

Orchestra; Band; Motion Picture 
Projection Staff; Dance Electri- 
cal Staff; Honor Society 3, 4; 
Tech Club. 




ROBERT FRANKS 
College 33 Cherry St. 

"With silence . . . be thou politic." 
Plans to attend college, probably 
Northeastern . . . ambition is to 
be a success . . . wills to the 
school a successful student coun- 
cil in future years . . . W.H.S. 
memoirs . . . the wonderful co- 
operation received from the teach- 
ers on various activities . . . can 
be found with Ed, and Ben. 
Junior Class President; President 
of Student Council 4; Art Club 
2, 3, 4; Graduation Marshall 3; 
Mirror Business Staff 3; R.S. Huff 
Memorial Committee; Dance Com- 
mittee 4; Junior Prom Committee. 



ELIZABETH FRIZZELL 



Plans to attend college . . . de- 
sires to be a nurse . . . likes 
lunch periods . . . wills to Miss 
Hirst's chemistry class some oint- 
ment for burns . . . friends in- 
clude Nellie, Carol, and Nancy. 
Monitor 3, 4; Newspaper Staff 4; 
Mirror Business Staff 2; Mirror 
Literary Staff 3, 4; Debating Club 
3, 4; National Honor Society 
3,4. 



NAOMI FRIES 

Business 78 Thornton Rd. 

"A smile recures the 
wounding of frown." 

Plans to go to B.U. . . . desires 
to be a medical secretary . . . 
wills to Miss Mooney a recording 
machine to save her voice . . . 
W.H.S. memoirs . . . the football, 
basketball, and hockey games 
. . . partners in mischief are 
Gussy, Joan, and Carolyn. 
Art Club 2, 3, 4; Honor Roll 2; 
Football Usher 4; Monitor 4; 
Commercial Club 4. 



-^/ 





Prentice St. 
the gentlest heart." 



College 49 Prentice St. 

"The mildest manners and 



JOAN GALLANT 

Business 22 Sun St. 

"On your eyelids crown 

the god of sleep." 

Plans to work in an office after 
graduation . . . chums are Jean, 
Betty, and Nancy . . . wills to 
Nancy Jennings half of all her 
sleep . . . ambition is to be a 
bookkeeper 

Monitor 3, 4; Commercial Club 
4; Bowling 3. 




BENJAMIN GARDENER 
College 89 Myrtle St. 

"To be a well favored man 
is the gift of fortune." 
After graduation plans to enter 
the Armed Services ... go to 
college on the G.I. Bill . . . 
Friends Eddie, Bob, and Brodie 
. . . memoirs . . . the walk to and 
from school . . . wills the cafeteria 
bigger and better meals. 
Debating Club 2; Art Club 4; 
Dramatic Club 3. 




THERESA GARGONE 
Business 7 Pratt Ave. 

"Silence is golden." 
Ambition is to hear wedding 
bells . . . would like to work in 
an office . . . wills to Ann all her 
books . . . memoirs studies . . . 
pals are Helen, Maureen, Mary. 
Commercial Club 4. 



RICHARD GEOFFRION 
Business 39 Gore St. 

"Ay, every inch a king." 
After graduation Dick plans to 
join the Navy or Air Force. . . 
Don, Whitey, and Segur are his 
pals . . . building a hot rod, his 
ambition . . . wills to Nick a 
"hot" 40 Mercury. 
Photography Club 2, 3. 




SPENCER GEORGE 

College 63 Edwin Rd. 

"He proved best man 

of the field." 

Sonny plans to further his ed- 
ucation after graduation . . . has 
hopes of becoming a professional 
baseball player . . . liked the mad 
rush to the cafeteria best of all 
. . . partners in crime are Sonny, 
Lopez, and Hubie LcBlanc. 
Baseball 2, 3, 4. 




JUDITH GATES 

Business 367 Crescent ST. 

"Silence is the perfectest 

herald of joy." 

Judy's pals of W.H.S. were 
Jackie, Lorraine, and Carol . . . 
future plans include night school 
and secretarial work . . . liked all 
the teachers at W.H.S. . . . wills 
to Mr.Smyth many good typists 
Honor Roll 3; Homeroom Leg- 
islature 3; Business Staff o: 
Mirror 3, 4; Commercial Club 4 
Class Day Usher 3 




ANTHONY GENOVA 

College 144 College Farm Rd. 

"What a spendthrift he 

is of his tongue." 

Future plans . . . Tufts . . . 
would like to be an engineer . . . 
friends include, Dick, Stan, and 
Dick Lassen . . . engineering 
looks good to him . . . wills a 
Marilyn Monroe calendar to Mr. 
Pettinati . . . likes the two o'clock 
bell best. 
Rifle Club 3, 4. 

fa 






ANTHONY J. GENTILE 

College 15 Bowker St. 

"With all good grace to 

grace a gentleman." 

After graduation, Tony plans to 
go to Northeastern . . . engineer- 
ing is to be his goal following 
graduation . . . liked the clubs 
at W.H.S. the best. 




ROBERTA GARRAHAN 
ollege 18 Brookfield Rd. 

As full of spirit as 
the month of May." 
plans to go to a secretarial 
school . . . then plans to be a 
private secretary . . . study periods 
rank high on Roberta's best likes 
list . . . wills two one-way el- 
evators to W.H.S. . . . Best friends 
are Sandy, Mary, Weezie, and 
Bon Bom. 

Dramatic Club 3, 4; Glee Club 
2; Class Day Usher 3; Graduation 
Usher 3. 




JOHN GASPARI 
Business 32 Brown St. 

"/ shall laugh myself to death." 

Plans to work days and attend 
night school . . . buddies are 
Bill, Tony, and Paul . . . ambition 
is to be an auditor . . . thinks 
W.H.S. is the best run and best 
equipped school around . . . wills 
Miss Devane to the Juniors. 
Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Band 
2,3,4. 




LOUISE GATELY 
Business 33 Plympton St. 

"and shining morning face." 
Liked football and basketball 

games, dances .it WHS. . . . 

friends . . . Jean and Bonnie 
. . . wills to Bonnie a senior year 
full of choice teachers. 
Dramatic Club 2. J; Commer- 
cial Club i 



27 



ALVIN GOLDSMITH 

College 74 Weatherbee Rd. 

"Gold, what can it not do, 

and undo!" 

Al would like to become an 
electronic engineer after gradua- 
tion from college . . . remembers 
Mr. Ryan's quick remarks and 
answers . . . can often be seen 
with Bob. 
Radio Club 2, 3, 4. 




GEORGE GOULD 
Trade 207 South St. 

"Let's go hand in hand, 
not one before another." 
George would like to join the 
Navy after graduation but will 
never realize his ambition of 
making a lot of money if he does 
... his best friends are Ray, 
Jim, and Jim ... he wishes to 
leave his gray shirt to Ray . . . 
graduation rates high with him. 
Basketball 4. 




ELIZABETH GRENIER 
Business 233 Grove St. 

"Thought is free." 
Betty's ambition is a private sec- 
retary . . . wills to Miss Mooney 
all her shorthand notebooks . . . 
was seen around the corridors of 
W.H.S. with Mary, Honey, and 
Joan . . . liked best of all the 
football games and dances. 
Commercial Club 4. 



i 




<^-^ 







^_^««vX 






FAY GRIFFIN 

1177 Main St. 
". . . joy delights in joy." 
Sargent College is Fay's goal 
after graduation ,Sr"\ ambition 
... to own a convertible . . . her 
partners are Jean, Elaine, and 
Shirl . . . liked all the terrific 
times and the swell kids at 
W.H.S. . . . she wills to Jean, a 
new set of keys to the car. 
Red Cross Representative; Sports 
2, 3, 4. 




CAROLYN GRIFF 

Business 116 Charles St. 

"Dance on the sands and 
yet no footing seen." 

An especially appropriate quota- 
tion for this young lady . . . has 
set as her goal ... a spot as a 
professional dancer on T.V. . . . 
among her likes were the fire 
and Civil Defense drills at W.H.S. 
. . . may be seen with Naomi, 
Phyllis, and Nan. 
Dramatic Club 2, 4; Commercial 



LAWRENCE GUERIN, JR. 
Trade 67 Hall St. 

"He observes of all observers." 
Larry's plans include working as 
a carpenter . . . best pals are 
Shorty, Bob, and Paul . . . likes 
all sports . . . ambition is to be- 
come a contractor. 




JAMES GUIANO 

Trade 56 Oak St. 

"He does it with a better grace, 

but I do it more natural." 

Jim's ambition is to be an auto- 
mobile mechanic . . . W.H.S. 
Memoir: the auto shop and the 
work in the shop . . . Pals: Tony, 
Tom, and Dick. 



28 




ALICE GUSTAFSON 
Business 11 Milton St. 

"A merry heart goes all the day." 
After graduation, Alice plans to 
work and attend B.U. . . . ambi- 
tion ... to become a medical 
secretary . . . her close friends 
are Carolyn, Joan, and Naomi 
.... likes best at W.H.S. basket- 
ball and football games . . . wills 
to Miss Mooney ... a new type 
of Gregg shorthand. 
Photography Club 2; Class Day 
Usher 3; Monitor 4; Commercial 
Club 4. 



JEAN HAPENNEY 

Business 1 Alder Terrace 

"Oh, 1 am stabbed 
with laughter!" 

Jean wants to join the Women's 
Marine Corps and become a rank 
higher than D.R. . . . may 
be seen constantly with Franny, 
Betty, and Dickie . . . liked desks 
in Room 109 .. . wills to Miss 
Mooney another boy just like 
Charlie. 

Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Commer- 
cial Club 2; Football Usher 3, 4. 




MARY ANN HARRINGTON 

College 65 Lake-view Terrace 

"Sincerity is a vital power." 

Become a laboratory technician 
. . . wills to Mr. Brainerd an audi- 
ble telephone . . . pals are Matilda, 
Diane, and Marion . . . likes 
the friendly people at W.H.S. 
Art Club 2, 3; Bowling 2, 3, 4; 
Photo Club 4; Women's Club 4. 





CLAIRE HART 

College 46 Hillcroft Rd. 

"Hope is the parent of faith." 

Hopes to attend a business col- 
lege and then fashion school . . . 
wills a much appreciated set of 
golf clubs to Miss Whitford . . . 
liked the art classes which will 
prepare her for her aspiration, 
a dress designer . . . pals 
Carol, Lois, and Marilyn. 




^= > . 




PAUL HARVEY 



Business 1680 Trapelo 

"And keep my drooping 
eyelids open wide ..." 
Wills Miss Tahaney a quiet room 
before school . . . noted for his 
drum playing . . . hopes to be a 
truck driver after graduation. 




JAMES HART 
Trade 17 Spring St. 

"What's done can't be undone." 
Future plans are join the Navy 
.... ambition to be rich . . . 
liked the three o'clock bell . . . 
pals are Tony, and Monk. 
Basketball 2, 3, 4. 




EILEEN HAYNES 

Business 38 Turner St. 

"We the globe can 
compass soon . . ." 

Hopes to attend air school . . . 

liked the sports programs at 

W.H.S. . . . pals are Av, Shirley, 

and Mickey. 

Junior Prom Committee 3; Art 

Club 2, 3, 4. 




DAVID HAYWARD 

Business 79 Warren St. 

"This man is a wit.'" 

Our future Coast Guarder . . . 
leaves softer desks for the tired 
juniors . . . ambition is to go to 
California via Florida with Tom, 
and Don. 




FRANCIS HILL 

Business 4 River Ave. 

lie /'./.'A a heart 
as sound as a bill." 

"Spug" hopes to become a C.P.A. 

and make loads of money . . . 
girls on his list are J.ukie and 
Mike . . .wills to Mi^s Dev.ine 
his English marks. 



29 



BEVERLY ANN HOLMES 
Business 107 Grove St. 

"If you will patiently 
dance in our round." 
Bev plans working and getting 
married . . . wills to the Freshmen 
her locker key . . . typing, art 
classes, Pat and Nancy get an A 
from Bev . . . likes dancing and 
happy people. 

Art Club 2; Commercial Club 
3; 4. 




TANIA HUMPHREYS 
Business 103 Riverview Ave. 

"The blush is beautiful." 
Tania hopes to get married . . . 
enjoys Tote, cooking, and week- 
ends without homework which 
she can spend with Chet, Rose, 
and Barb. 
Camera Club 2, 3; Monitor 3; 4. 




LORRAINE JACKSON 
Business 44 Everett St. 

"A quiet mind is 
richer than a crown." 
Business School and then to be 
a secretary . . . she is usually seen 
about W.H.S. with Jackie, Judy, 
Mary, and Pat. 

Mirror Business Staff 3; News- 
paper Staff 3, 4; Class Day & 
Graduation Day Usher 3- 




^^, 



^\ ^ 




LEONARD N. JOHNSON 

College 19 Whitford Terrace 

"A good heart is the sun . . . 

for it shines bright and 

never changes . . ." 

A future collegiate, Len wills 

Miss Betts a "bon eleve de 

Francais." ... He can usually be 

found with Czar Brinn, Shultzy 

Cusack, Fitz, and Joan. 

Photo Club 2, 3, 4; N.H.S. 2, 

4; H.R. Legislature 2; Literary 

Staff of Mirror 4; Senior Dance 

.Committee Chairman. 




NANCY LEE JENNINGS 
General 43 Curtis St. 

"Understanding is the 
wealth of wealths." 
Powers Modeling School is fore- 
most in Nancy's post-graduation 
plans, where she hopes to fulfill 
her ambition of becoming a 
model . . . tops with her at 
W.H.S. . . . assemblies. 
Monitor 3; Mirror Representa- 



^h 






BETTY JENSEN 
General 45 Brightwood Rd. 

"Thou art gifted with 
much that is fine." 
After willing Mr. Clark an all 
girl rifle team, Betty hopes to get 
married . . . She'll always remem- 
ber Donna, Soupy, and Helen in 
gym . . . Ambition ... to be- 
come a Physiotherapist. 
Newspaper Column 2, 3, 4; Mon- 
itor 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; 
Mirror Representative 4. 




RICHARD E. JOHNSON 
College 436 Forest St. 

"One man in his time 
plays many parts." 
On to college says "Dick", but 
he'll always remember the girls 
at W.H.S. . . . Willing all his 
money to everybody should sure 
cause a riot, thinks Dick. 
Rifle Club 2, 3; 



30 




RICHARD COTTON 
Business 20 Arlington Rd. 

"He was a scholar . . ." 
"Sam" the boy with the smile 
. . . liked lunch periods best at 
W.H.S. . . . leaves his little 
brother to Mr. Garrahan . . . 
headed for the armed forces. 



RICHARD JOYAL 

Business ' Dartmouth St. 

"A man of manners." 

Popular "Dick" often seen with 
"Bo" and Don reveals he hopes 
to become a big-leaguer some 
day . . . thanks the teachers for 
being so patient with him. 
Baseball 2, 3, 4; Home Room 
Representative 3, 4. 




EMILY K1LBOURN 
Business 73 Worcester Lane 

"Content is happiness." 
Emily is looking forward to a 
trip to Texas, after which she 
hopes to become an engineer 
. . . can be seen in her favorite- 
period, lunch, with Rena, Jay, 
and Shirl. 
Bowling 2, 3, 4; Music 2. 




LORRAINE KIRSCH 

College 59 Cherry St. 

"She looks as clear as morning, 
roses, newly washed with dew." 
Lorraine, our future representative 
to Mass. State, hopes to become 
a real estate saleswomen, but not 
before she leaves Miss Mac- 
Quarrie some non-dulling pencils 
. . . Pente tops her list of friends. 
Photo Club 2; Business Mirror 
Staff 2, 3, 4; Sophomore Dance 
Committee 2. 



K\f°) 



MICHELE LALLY 
Business 728 South St. 

"As good luck would have it." 
Micky plans to work in an office 
after graduation . . . ambition is 
work and going out on Saturday 
night ... all the kind teachers 
were liked by her . . . can be 
seen with Shirley, and Eileen 
anytime. 

Homeroom Representative 3; Mir- 
ror Representative 2. 




C^ 



CHARLES LALLY 

General 28 Banks St. 

"My heart is true as Steel." 

"Chuck" is looking forward to a 
radio career and leaves Waltham 
a new school in which he hopes 
homework is forgotten. 
Football 2, 3, 4; Exchange Day 
Committee 3. 



FRANCES LANDRY 

217 Felton St. 
"The part was aptly fitted 
and naturally performed." 

Franny plans to take an office 
job after graduation, but college 
is a possibility . . . she liked the 
crowded cafeterias of W.H.S. 
. . . Her pals are Jeannie, Kelly, 
and Lorraine . . . wills to Miss 
Mooney another charming red- 
head. 

Red Cross 3; Dramatic Club 4; 
Commercial Club 4; Football 
Usher 4. 




ROBERT LANDRY 

General 31 Gorham St. 

"He is well paid that 

is well satisfied." 

Bob, Co-Captain of the Football 
team plans to serve Uncle Sam 
and then become a physical Ed 
teacher . . . pals are Dick, Stan, 
and Mike. 
Football 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4. 




RICHARD LASSEN 
College VS Upton Rd. 

"He Invs in fame . . ." 
Northeastern is Dick's goal after 
graduation . . ambition is to be 
an electrical engineer . . . seen 
with Will, Jim, and Ray . . . 
wills to Mr. Pettinatn ■ new 
drawing board. 

Basebail 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 
4; Tech Club 3; National Honor 
Society 3, 4; Dance Committee 3, 
4; Projection Staff 2, 3, 4. 3 , 



DORIS LA ROSEE 
College 163 Plympton St. 

"The mirror of all courtesy." 
Best friends . . . Dawn, Glen 
and Priscilla . . . Plans to attend 
Mansfield Beauty Academy . . . 
Likes Miss Chase's classes . . . 
dislikes conceited boys or girls 
. . . Ambition ... to own beauty 

shop. 

Art Club 2; Mirror Staff 3; Foot- 
ball Usher 4; Newspaper Column 
3,4. 





MARIAN LA ROSE 
Business 265 Lake St. 

"Bid the cheek be 
ready with a blush." 
Marian will always remember the 
typing class near School street 
. . . wants to make Whitey happy 
. . . desires secretarial work . . . 
Best girl friend Marilyn Mc- 
Dermott. 




WILLIAM 
College 
"He would 
tor 

At W.H.S 



LAVASH 

46 Myrtle St. 

not flatter Neptune 

his trident." 

Bill liked the girls, 
gym, lunch, and leaves Mr. Sheehy 
. . . an undefeated golf team . . . 
After graduation . . . Boston Col- 
lege, then ... his own business 
. . . Friends . . . Dick, and Phil. 
Rifle Club 3; Football 3; Base- 
ball 4; Hockey 2, 3; Class Vice- 
President 2; Basketball 3, 4; 



Golf 3, 4. 




C^\ 




FRED LE BLANC 
Business 22 Sunset 

"The force of his own 
merit make his way." 
This ardent Red Sox fan hopes to 
someday own his own camera 
shop . . . -Any form of photo- 
graphy would satisfy 
plans . . . Fellow 
Mr. Perkins and 



of 

his future 
shutterbugs; 
Pete Maselli. 



DAVID P. LE FORT 
College 9 Middle Street Ct. 

"He must, he is. he cannot but 

be wise." 
Good looking Dave plans to at- 
tend Northeastern . . . engineering 
is his ambition . . . wills to next 
year's senior class plenty of good 
times . . . friends include the 
U.B.I. -^^^ 

Dance Committee 4; Mirror Lit- 
erary Staff 4; National Honor 
Staff 3, 4; Newspaper Staff 3, 4; 
Camera Club 2; Tech Club 3, 4; 
Club Co-ordinator 4. 

( T/ : 

DONALD LELIEVRE 

General 66 Bennett St. 

"That full star that 

ushers in the even." 

His plans at the moment include 

a course in salesmanship . . . 

Friends . . . John and Bobby . . . 

Friendly . . . good-looking. 

Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4. 



(jen< 




PAUL LEMIEUX 
Trade 59 Guinan St. 

"True industry doth kindle 
honour's fire." 
"Frenchi" hopes to attend Mass. 
Agricultural School; . . . pre- 
paring to own a farm . . . the 
majority of his time is spent on 
Hot Rods or with Bob, Ernie, 
and Warren. 



32 




CLARA LEONE 

Business 25 Williams St. 

"Fortune brings in some boats 

that are not steer'd." 
Clara will long remember the 
laughs in Mr. Ryan's room . . . 
wills the future seniors all her 
books . . . Her present plans in- 
clude working in an office . . . 
Some of her pals are Lucy, Ann, 
Mary, and Marie. 
Commercial Club 4; Music Club 
3, 4. 



ARLENE LOPEZ 
Home Ec. 276 River St. 

"No legacy is so rich as honesty." 

Arlene aspires to become a nurse 
. . . she would like to receive 
her training at Newton-Wellesley 
Hospital . . . She leaves a sink to 
Miss Chase . . . She is often seen 
with Lany Wilson, Judy Camp- 
bell, and Donna Brown. 




JESSIE LOWELL 
Business 276 Dale St. 

"Travelers must be content." 

Following her graduation, Jessie 
plans to work in an office . . . 
True to her quotation, she would 
like to travel . . . Charlotte, and 
Betty are tops with Jess. 
Girls' Sports 2, 3, 4; Knitting 
Club 2; F.H.A. 3, 4; Commercial 
Club 4; Monitor 4. 




Ryan's never ceasing 
. wills to Ann Powers 



MARY MACLELLAN 
Business 20 Norumbega Tr. 

"A maiden never bold . . ." 
Mary desires clerical work at 
Raytheon . . . wants to be an 
efficient employee . . . partners 
in mirth: Lorraine, Clara 
Liked Mr. 
appetite . . 
her typewriter to write her 
theories. 

Girls' Sports 2, 3, 4; Knitting 
Club 3, 4; Commercial Club 4. 

EDITH MAC NEIL 

Business 139 Robbins St. 

"Thy heart is big." 

Edie's ambition is to become a 

secretary . . . going to Texas and 

work are her immediate plans 

. . . pet peeve, Emily . . . friends: 

Em, Shirl, and Tisha. 

Art Club 2, 3, 4; Senior Prom 

Committee. 






JOAN MACLEOD 

Business 41 Eddy St. 

". . . As nature was in 

making graces dear." 

Joan's ambition is to become a 
secretary after graduation . . . 
wills to W.H.S. all her money. 
Commercial Club 4; Art Club 








BETTY MAC QUEEN 

Business 59 Cherry St. 

"All orators are dumb 
when beauty pleadeth." 

Ambition-secretary . . . cute, red- 
head in 112 . . . pals Judy Gates, 
Carol Borises . . . wills a silent 
alarm to W.H.S. 
Commercial Club 3, 4; Knitting 
Club 2. 




JUSTINE MAHONEY 
Business 12 Fern St. 

"// adds a precious 
seeing to the eye." 
W.H.S. memoir: lunch periods 
. . .wills to Diane Beck her limited 
vocabulary . . girl friends 

Emily Kilbourne, Rena Parello 
and Shirley Natoli. 




JOHN MAILLET 
General 1 i Cross St. 

". . . for n hat his /' 
thinks his tongue speaks." 

Will do plenty of fishing after 
graduation . . . the dances and 
clubs, tops at W.H.S. . . . friends 
Fred, Lawrence, and Robert . . . 
wills to Miss Chase his seat in 
the art J.iss 



33 



DAVID MANNING 
College 50 Brightwood Rd. 

"I am not in the call 
of common men." 
"Big Dave" looks forward to col- 
lege and "living the life of 
Riley" . . . best of all at W.H.S. 
enjoyed Miss Betts' French class 
. . . Cliff and Pete are his con- 
stant companions. 
Hockey 3, 4. 




JOAN MARSHALL 

Business 63 Smith St. 

"A light heart lives long." 

Private secretary is her goal . . . 
W.H.D.H. Record Poll was tops 
with her . . . can be seen with 
Jean, Leona, and Diana. 
Commercial Club 4. 




JOAN MARTORILLI 
College 33 Vernon St. 

"I know she taketh most delight 

in music, instruments, 
and poetry." 
Noted for her prodigious piano 
talent . . . hopes to attend Boston 
Conservatory of Music ... be- 
come concert pianist . . . accom- 
plices . . . Lorraine, Wiffie, and 
Matilda. 

Monitor 3, 4; Dance Committee 
3, 4; Chairman 4; Executive 
Council 3, 4; Senior Dance Com 
mitte 





MATTSON 

65 Dix St. 



JEA 
Business 

"A golden mind stoops not 

to shoxc of dross." 
Future plans include office work, 
then private secretary . . . dances 
and clubs were tops with her at 
W.H.S. . . . wills to Miss Mooney 
a new time watch . . . can be seen 
with Joan and Diane. 
Knitting Club 2; Commercial 
Club 4. 



PETER MASELLI 
Business 116 Felton St. 

"Brevity is the sweet fruit." 
opes to own an appliance shop 
. . wills to the teachers the ex- 
perience they gained while teach- 
ing him . . . Fred LeBlanc, and 
Dick Stiefel. "*»-*»_ 

Radio Club 2; Camera Club 3, 4; 
Yearbook Photographer 2, 3, 4. 

OHN MAYNARD 

General 188Vi Adams St. 

"From camp to camp 

through the night." 

Plans to give Uncle Sam a help- 
ing hand and also to retire at 45 
. . . wills to the juniors his place 
. . . friends include Jim, Cliff, 
and Don. 






ANTHONY J. MAZZARINI 
Trade 58 Pond St. 

"As full of spirit as the 
month of May." 
Hopes to follow his trade after 
high school . . . wills to Armand 
Foskin one cigar . . . Seen with 
Ron and Jim . . . "The Gustin 
Gang". 

Baseball 2, 3, 4; Student Council; 
Basketball 2, 3, 4. 



34 




JOSEPH MC BRIDE 
Trade 307 School St. 

"Now good digestion 
wait on appetite." 
After graduation Joe hopes to go 
into welding trade . . . enjoyed 
graduation day . . . wills Mr. 
Harding basketball shirt #19 . . . 
Jack, Joe, and Ray make up the 
trio. 
Basketball 2, 3- 



MARILYN MCDERMOTT 

Business 1 16 College Farm Rd. 

"yet marked I u here the 

bolt of Cupid fell; 

Secretary . . . make Paul happy 
. . . liked best the Trade School 
and a certain auto mechanic . . . 
friends Marion, Doris, and Shir- 
ley. 




JANET M( .C.ILVARY 
Business 1 ' Willow 

I good heart's north gold." 
Alter graduation . . . work in an 

office . . . English .mil filing 
rate high . . . friends Mary, The- 
resa, and Lorraine . . . wills to 
the future seniors all the good 
times she had in gym. 
Commercial Club 4; Knitting 
Club i 




ALLAN MCKINNON 
College 104 Whitman Rd. 

"Men of few words 
are the best men." 
Wants to attend Northeastern 
. . . .liked teachers and gym . . . 
friends Don and Bob . . . mem- 
ber of Rifle Club . . . wants to 
be a cowboy singer. 



LAWRENCE MCLAUGHLIN 
General 147 Alden St. 

Behold, his eye, as bright 
as is the eagle's." 
Wants to join Marines, retire for 
a good pension at 30 ■ ■ ■ liked 
math in 113... wills to the new 
pupils all his teachers. 
Hockey; Football; Camera Club. 




^ 



JOAN MCMENIMAN 
Business 19 Milton St. 

"Since your worth wider 
than the ocean is . . ." 

Ambition . . . Secretary . . . dances 
and football games rated high 
with her at W.H.S. . . . wills to 
Miss Mooney a record of the 
transcriptions . . . friends Carolyn, 
Naomi, and Alice. 
Knitting Club 2; Literary Staff 
of Mirror 4; Football Usher 4; 
Commercial Club 4. 




BERNARD MIKULA 

College 18 Calvary St. 

"Custom hath made it in him 

a property of easiness." 

Attend Maritime Academy after 
graduation ... be an engineer 
. . . pals John Ferrara and John 
Ferrell . . . wills to the Junior 
Class . . . teachers. 
Art Club 2, 3; Drama Club 4. 




PATRICIA MILLAR 
Bnsiness 194 Charles St. 

"Put money in thy purse." 
Future plans . . . work in an office 
. . . favorite teacher ... Mr. Ryan 
. . . friends Shirley Natoli, Arlene 
Sullivan, and Jay Mahoney. 
( ommercial Club 4. 





MARY ANN MII.l.IKEN 
Business 15 i Bacon St. 

"Strong reasons » 
strong actions." 
Quiet Mary plans to work after 
graduation . . enjoys going places 
and seeing things . . . with ( bar- 
I.e. 



35 



PATRICIA MILLS 

Business 218 South St. 

"// there is a laugh 
she will laugh it." 

Plans to work affter graduation 
. . . wants to meet a millionaire 
. . . pals are Nancy, Eileen, and 
Beverly . . . liked lunchtime best 
at W.H.S. . . . wills to the incom- 
ing sophomores her papers to 
copy. 
Art Club 2. 





ROBERT F. MOBILIA 
Business 428 River St. 

"They are rich who 
have true friends." 
Seen working at a local cleaners 
. . . may attend college after 
graduation. 
Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4. 






JANET MOBILIA 

Business 52 Francis St. 

"I have bought golden opinions 

from all sorts of people." 

"Mo" wants to work in an office 
.... liked walking the corridors 
before school with Dick. 



LORRAINE G. MONAHAN 
College 18 Lexington T 

". . . nor custom stale her 
infinite variety." 

Hopes to attend Agricultural Col- 
lege to train for Veterinary work 
. . . liked the social life at W.H.S. 
. . . and chumming with Sandy 
best of all . . . wills to anyone 
interested W.H.S. and all it has 
to offer. 

Art Club 2; Dance Committee 
3, 4; Mirror Representative 3, 4. 



I 




MATILDA MOGAN 

College 27 School St. 

"Happiness courts thee 
in her best array." 

Plans to attend some college in 
the East to become a nurse . . . 
pals are Tooie, Joan, and Lorraine 
. . . wills to Mr. May an algebra 
class that will study algebra. 

C Girls' Sports 2, 3, 4; Dramatic 
Club 2, 3, 4; Business and Ed- 
itorial Staff Mirror 3; Newspaper 
Staff 3, 4. 

ATTN, 

SHIRLEY MONKS 
Home Ec. 17 Circle Drive 

"She comes with gusts 
of laughter." 

Hopes to become a buyer at 
Enterprise in the near future . . . 
likes posture classes in Gym with 
Judy and playing tricks on Donna 
and Myrtle . . . wills to Mr. Curry 
a few new specimens for his 
Biology classes. 
Secretary of F.H.A. 3, 4. 




') 











CHARLES MORAN 
Busines 52 Columbus Ave. 

"Pleasure and action make 
the hours seem short." 
Wills to the school all his posses- 
sions . . . plans include working 
and continuing school . . . am- 
bition is to become a salesman. 
Hockey 2, 3, 4. 



36 




JANE MORRIS 
Business 214 River St. 

"Who is it can read a woman?" 

Hopes to become a medical sec- 
retary . . . pals are Joan and 
Irene, they make up the Three 
Musketeers . . . likes Mr. Dwyer, 
football games, and lunch. 
Commercial Club 4; Photography 
Club 2. 



GEORG1 Ml IS! 

Business $1 Cross St. 

"lis education forms 
./ common mind." 

PI. ms .ittcr graduation to be .1 
pilot in the Navy Air Corps . . . 
likes the teachers very much and 
enjoys being with Hal, Bob, and 
Bill . . . wills to Miss Leary the 
whole Business Course. 




JAMES MULA 
General 90 Robbins St. 

"Above the average man." 
Alter graduation he will join the 
Marines . . . liked his first and 
second year at W.H.S. . . . 
Friends include John, Cliff, and 
Gino. . . . Wills parking space 
to Dave Nugent. 
Monitor 2, 3. 





MARY MULA 

College 246 Newton St. 

"All things ready if 
our minds be so." 

Plans to attend Framingham State 
Teachers College . . . Wills to Mr. 
Zullo an A-l Algebra Class 
friends /?~\ ■ Sybils- Grace, am 
Andy. 

Girls' Sports 2, 3, 4; Mirror Rep 
resentatlve 2; Newspaper Colum 
3, Eritor-in-chief 4. 





PATRICK MURPHY 

Business 53 Whitman Rd 

"There is history in 

all men's lives." 

Plans to join the Navy . . . May 
be seen with . . . Don and Alan 
. . . likes the two o'clock bell 
. . . wills Mr. Garrahan his time 
after school. 




BARBARA MURPHY 

Home Ec. 89 Bedford St. 

"Be merry, be merry." 

"Murph" thinks the cafeteria 
should be equiped with a juke 
box . . . Plans to be a switch 
board operator . . . liked the 
Physics classes and last period on 
Friday . . . pals Nancy, Shirly, 
and Pat. ~>v 

F.H.A. Club 2; Bowling 2, 3; 
Dramatics Club 2. 




Co 

THOMAS MURPHY 

Business 53 Berkshire Rd. 

"/ have no precious time 

at all to spend." 

Plans to attend a business school 
in order to realize his ambitions 
of becoming a buyer . . . Liked 
to dance at W.H.S. ... the 
minutes we were allowed to talk. 
Art Club; Dance Committee. 




SHIRLEY NATOLI 
Business 109 Pine St. 

"Your most sweet voice." 
After graduation plans to visit 
New York and become an inves- 
tigator for the F.B.I. . . . Followers 
are Margie, Tisha, and Pat. 
Cheerleading 2, 3; Dramatic Club 
2, 3; Art Club 4. 




MARION NELSON 
College 17 Wellington St. 

"Fairest gems lie deep<. 

Plans to go to Lasell Junior Col- 
lege and become an executive 
secretary . . . Liked participation 
in school activities with Gail, Peg, 
and Sybil. 

National Honor Society 3, 4; Mir- 
ror Staff 3, 4; Secretary-Treasurer 

of Student Council v ) Drama 
Club 3, 4; D.uue Committee 3, 4. 



37 



SHIRLEY NELSON 

Business 40 Mayall Rd. 

"Whose nature is so far 

from doing wrong." 

"Shirl" hopes to be a buyer after 

graduation . . . plans to attend a 

school of higher learning . . . 

enjoyed Girls' Sports most at 

W.H.S. 

Sports 2, 3, 4; Football Usher. 




CHARLES NEWFELL 
General 70 River St. 

"Some achieve greatness." 
Very friendly . . . yearns for the 
two o'clock bell . . . plans to be 
a big success . . . likes girls and 
food . . . Dick Tracy rates top 
on his list. 





GAIL NICKERSON 
College 72 Prentice St. 

"The fairest that eye 
could see . . ." 
Wants to become a nurse after 
graduation . . . probably attend 
Newton-Wellesley Hospital . . . 
Liked best at W.H.S. Mr. Sheehy 
. . . Friends — Peggy, Jackie, 
and Marion. 
President of Knitting Club 2 




C=\' 



RICHARD NORCROSS 

College 42 Shirley Rd. 

"He is divinely bent 

on meditation." 

University of Mass. is Dick's 
goal, where he plans to major in 
agriculture of Science ... his 
friends are Larry, Rodger, and 
Dick . . . liked W.H.S. football 
games . . . wills to Mr. Hood all 
the compositions he wrote. 
Waltham High Band; Art Club 
2, 3, 4. 




SHIRLEY NIX 

Business 15 Cutting Lane 

"Here is a dear and 

true industrious friend." 

"Shirl" plans to become a Dental 
Hygenist . . . Her ambition is to 
fly a plane . . . Spends most of 
her time in Wellesley, at the 
stand, and with Wiffie, Ang, and 
Arlene. 

Business Staff of Mirror 2, 3; 
Knitting Club 2, 4; Photography 
Club 4. 





. MARILYN OBERBECK 
College 8"? Ellery Rd. 

"A maiden never bold." 
Plans to attend Mass. Gen. Hosp. 
after graduation . . . pals with 
Peggy, Claire, and Gail . . . wills 
Miss Whitford a new file 14. 
Knttinc; Club 2, 4; Photography 
Club 3. 




JANET C. OHNEMUS 
College 5 Woodlawn Ave. 

"She uttereth piercing eloquence." 
Plans to attend Newton-Wellesley 
Hospital . . . ambition to become 
a member of the school committee 
. . . friends . . . Mary, Jean, and 
Fay. 

Drama Club 2, 3, 4; Senior Class 
Secretary; Mirror Staff 2, 3, 4; 
D.A.R. Good Citizenship Award; 
National Honor Society 3, 4; Col- 
umn Staff 3, 4; Monitor 3, 4; 
Librarian 3. 





IAN ORMON 

College 27 Parmenter Rd. 

"Frame your mind to 

mirth and merriment ." 

Plans to attend U. of Mass. . . . 
wants to be a millionaire . . . 
liked the dusty parking space 
. . . friends . . . Ed, Bob, Ben. 
Rifle Club; Art Club. 



CATHERINE L. PARELLO 
Business 23 Reyem St. 

"Though she be but little. 
she is fierce." 
Petite "Ren.i" plans to attend 
business school after graduation 
. . . Her ambition is to be a med- 
ical secretary . . . Liked best at 
W.H.S. . . . the nights we didn't 
have homework . . . Her many 
tnends include Emily, Jay, and 
Shirley. . . . Wills to the juniors, 
all the books we used and more. 




ROBERT C. PARS 
General 481 Forest St. 

"Ambition should he made 
of sterner stuff." 
A future mechanic Bob's ambition 
is to be a millionaire . . . Law 
with Mr. Smythe was his favorite- 
pastime . . . when he wasn t with 
Chuck, Dave, or Frog. 




JEAN PEEL 

Business 20 Curve St. 

"Frailty, thy name is woman." 

Jean has plans for two years of 
colleee and then airline school 
. . . 'liked best at W.H.S. . . the 
escalator to the cooking room . . . 
Jean wills to Mr. Husson ... a 
quiet class of girls from IV DS 
. . . cohorts are Elaine, Joan, and 
Joan. 

Art Club 2; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Commercial Club 4; 
Football Usher 4; Knitting Club 
3 





NANCY PELLERIN 

Home Ec. 13 Russell St. 

"/ have not slept one wink." 

Nancy remembers best the friend- 
liness of all the pupils and tea- 
chers at W.H.S. . . . she feels 
that Betsy should have all her 
senior books . . . After graduation 
Nancy wants to be a telephone 
operator . . . Among friends are 
Barbara, Shirley, and Leona. 
Girls' Sports 4; Music 3. 




THOMAS PEIRCE 

Business 349 Waverly Oakes Rd. 

"Tis ever common that 

men are merriest when 

they are from home." 

After graduation Tom will drive 
a truck for his father . . . going 
to California via Florida is his 
greatest ambition . . . when not 
in trouble he can be seen with 
Dave, Pete, or Fred. 



\ 



^^\i 



5h 






MARY C. PENDERGAST 

Business 77 Summit St. 

"A light heart lives long." 

One of our busiest seniors . . . 
Mary's friends include Lorraine, 
Janet, and Jackie. . . wills to 
class of "55", the fulfillment of 
their hopes and ambitions . . . 
to exceed the achievements of the 
class of "54". 

Mirror Representative 2; Drama 
Club 2, 3, 4; Junior Class Sec- 
retary; Junior Prom Committee; 
Secretary-Treasurer of National 
Honor Society 3, 4; Dance Com- 
mittee 4; Senior Dance Commit- 
tee. 




RICHARD PERRY 
General 260 Newton St. 

"Brief let me be . . ." 
After graduation, the Marines . . . 
after Marines; State Police . . . 
Liked our headmaster . . . best 
friends . . . Jim, Dick, and Dick 
... to the future sophomores 
Dick wills a lunch clock. 
Art Club 4; Football 2, 3. 




ROBERT PITERS 
Business 89 Adams St. 

"Comb down his hair; loot, look.' 

It stands upright." 

After graduation, college or the 
service ... no ambitions . . . likes 
everything about W 11. S. . . . 
Bequeaths his skate guards to the 

Boston Bruins . . . pal Kenny. 
Hockey 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Clu 



39 



HAROLD PINSTEIN 

College 42 Nathan Rd. 

"Play out the play." 

Ambition is to marry a rich girl 
and live to a ripe old age . . . 
Liked the outstanding coaches at 
the High School . . . Wills to 
Tom Girolamo his basketball and 
sneakers, and his football uni- 
forms to Angelo Erba . . . Always 
with Tom, Don, Angelo. 
Football 2, 3, 4; Basketball J.V. 
2, 3, 4. 




DIANE PLACE 
Business 9 Lakeview Ter. 

"My thoughts are whirled 
like a potter's wheel." 
Easy to get along with . . . 
Diane plans to be a secretary 
. . . later get married . . . partners 
in crime are Marion, Joan, Jean. 




JAMES POACH 

College 135 Thornton Rd. 

"There is no better sign of a brave 

mind, than a hard hand." 

Plans to go to college . . . best 
friends are Rene and Dick . . . 
likes any study periods, especially 
in 201 . . . wills 100 packs of 
Dentine gum to Rene . . . ambi- 
tion to retire young. 
Baseball 2, 3, 4; Student Council 
4. 




DORIS E. POLLEY 
Business 14 Laurel Ave. 

"But heaven hath a hand 
in these events." 
Ambition in life is to go to Hono- 
lulu . . . future plans include 
Ottawa University, Kansas and a 
career as a director of religious 
education . . . pals are Marilyn 
and Marion . . . wills to Shirley 
Nelson a 5 volume set of dic- 
tionaries. 

Glee Club 2; Student Legislator 
4; Talent Show 2; Mirror Rep- 
resentative 3- 



/ 



SYBIL POWDEN 

College 23 Lawrence 

"A maiden hath no 
tongue but thought." 
Sybil intends to study Physical 
Therapy at Simmons College 
. . . friends are Andrea, Fay, 
and Mary . . . liked the social 
activities at W.H.S. 
Girls' Sports 2, 3, 4; Column 
Staff Reporter; Red Cross Rep- 
resentative 2, 3. 





DAVID PURDY 

Business 50 Princeton Ave. 

"To hear the sea maid's music." 

Dave wants to attend Boston Uni- 
versity and his ambition is to be 
an officer in the Navy . . . best 
friend is Patrick. 
Baseball 2, 3. 








ROSEMARIE RANDO 

Business 25 Rangely Rd. 

"There's Rosemary, that's 

for remembrance." 

Wants to work in an office . . . 

ambition is to be a housewife . . . 

liked best the study periods . . . 

wills her locker to anybody who 

wants it. 

Mirror Representative 2, 3; Glee 

Club. 



40 





PHILLIP REILLY 

College 27 Vernon St. 

"Desiring this man's art." 

Rembrandt of W.H.S. is headed 
for art school . . . high school 
memoirs include the lunch periods 
and Mrs. Gabriel . . . best friends 
are Sandy, Brodie, and Ed . . . 
wills to the cafeteria some new 
menus . . . ambition is to run 
through a bank vault, chest deep 
in money. 
Art Club 4; Dance Committee 4. 



CAROL RHODES 
College 69 Fremont Ave. 

"She sings as sweetly as a 
nightingale." 
Plans to work while furthering 
her education at night . . . hopes 
to marry after a while . . . likes 
the friendly attitude at W.H.S. 
. . . pals are Deadeye, Betty, and 
Nellie. 

Glee Club 2, 3; Camera Club 4; 
Honor Roll 2, 3, 4. 




DONALD RICHARDSON 
General 31 Rockridge Rd. 

". . . for what his heart 
thinks his tongue speaks." 
Plans to attend college . . . study 
electrical engineering . . . com- 
panions: Jim, Hal, Bill . . . wills 
to Jim Poach the pressure hose 
at R. J.s . . . liked best at W.H.S. , 
the lunch periods. 




WILLIAM RICHARDSON 

General 141 Grove Street 

"To be or not to be; 

that is the question." 

Looking forward to being a scrap 

metal and iron dealer, but not 

before marrying Janet S. . . . 

friends — Bill, Dick, and Don 

. . . enjoyed Mr. Sheehy's good 

humor. 

Senior Dance Committee. 




EDWARD ROBERTS 

College 32 Varnum Park 

"This the soldier's life, to have 

their balmy slumbers wak'd 

■with strife." 

Future plans include the service 

and engineering . . . enjoyed his 

three happy years at W.H.S. . . . 

and leaves Miss Hirst a class of 

"A" pupils. 

Rifle Club 2; Tech Club 3. 




WILLIAM ROBERGE 

College 937 Main St. 

"The good is oft interred 
■with their bones." 

Plans to attend college and be a 
lawyer . . . always with Freddie, 
Bob, and Jake around W.H.S. 
. . . wills the new elevator to the 
incoming sophomores . . . food 
in the cafe tops with Bill. 
Newspaper Staff 4. 





ROBERT SABEAN 
College 138 Dale St. 

"There is a divinity that shapes 
our ends." 
Intends to go to Houghton Col- 
lege to go into the ministry . . . 
wills to some junior his French 
book . . . liked the atmosphere of 
W.H.S. . . . friends are Larry, 
Lennie, Ronnie, and Paul. 
Photo Club 2, 3. 




JOSEPH SALPIETRO 

College 62 Lowell St. 

"Take all the swift advantage 

of the hour." 

Quiet Joe wants to attend Boston 
University after graduation. 





LAWRENCE SANGERMANO 
College 103 Calvary St. 

"11 ho dares do more is m 
"Sangee", alter willing Bob 
bean an en grav ed ilok tees a ool 
lege ot engineering in his future 
plans . . . teachers and gym pe- 
riods arc high on this sport en- 
joying boy's list. 
Photo Club 2 



41 



SHIRLEY SCHOOLS 
College 11 Hartwell St. 

"The April's in her eyes." 
Future plans for this popular lass 
are to attend Framingham Teach- 
er's College . . . one of W.H.S.'s 
peppy cheerleaders . . . Partners 
in mischief are Jean, Fay, and 
Ann. 

Legislator 2; Cheerleader 3, 4; 
Librarian; Girls' Sports 2; Sopho- 
more Hop Committee 2. 




PRISCILLA SCOTT 
College 173 Hammond St. 

". . . She's a lady." 
Scottie — attends Mass. Art School 
. . . friends: Doris, Dawn, and 
Glenda . . . Likes football games 
. . . wants to be a commercial 
artist. 

Dramatic Club 2; Art Club 3, 4; 
Football usher 3. 




DONALD SHAW 

General 193 Grove St. 

"Lend thy serious hearing 

to ithat I shall unfold." 

After graduation Shawski will be 
seen trimming windows . . . tops 
on friend list are Bill, Dick, and 
Jean. 



■7SN 




WILLIAM SIMMONS 

General 99 Willow St. 

"0, it is excellent to have a 
giant's strength." 

After graduation Bill hopes to go 
to a small college . . . Ambition 
Physical Ed. instructor . . . Likes 
sports . . . When he leaves Tom 
Girolamo will get an autographed 
picture of Yogi Berra . . . we hope 
. . . Pals are many. 
Football 2, 3, 4. 



NAN SILVERSTEIN 
College 856 Moody St. 

"The course of true lore 
never runs smooth." 
University of Mass. and to keep 
a date at the Eiffel Tower is in 
the future for Nan . . . Nan, 
whose favorites are Phil and 
Chuck . . . likes long vacations 
at W.H.S. 
rama Club Usher 3; Art Club. 




SANDRA SMITH 

College Box C, Waverly 

"Thy eternal summer shall 

not fade." 

Plans to attend a Junior College 
. . . and own her car . . . Liked 
W.H.S. elevator . . . Pals are 
Phiddy, Mai, and Pente. 
Bowling Team 2, 3; Dramatic 
Club 4. 




ANN SMYLIE 

Business 86 Boynton St. 

"Holds hands with any princess 

of the world." 

Glamorous Ann liked cheering 
at the games for W.H.S. . . . she 
wants to continue being a dental 
assistant after graduation . . . her 
friends include Janet, Shirl, and 
Joan. 

Cheerleader 3; Captain Cheer- 
leader 4. 




42 




RICHARD STIEFEL 

Business 214 Adams St. 

"An since, Methinks, I 
would not grow so fast." 

Dick wants to be a bank presi- 
dent . . . He appreciates the 
teachers who give little home- 
work ... he wills to Mr. Sheehy 
a school of good pupils. Chums 
. . . Pete, Chuck, and Fred. 



ARLENE SULLIVAN 
Business 245 Lake St. 

"Was this fair face the cause . . ." 
Would like to work for the F.B.I. 
after graduating . . . liked best 
History and a certain cafeteria 
table . . . friends: Pat, Gay and 
Shirl . . . likes sports. 
Bowling 2, 3; Baseball 3, i. 




BARBARA TAYLOR 

Business 68 Oak St. 

'// / could number %our 

graces ..." 
Good natured Barbara . . . wants 
to be future Raytheon worker . . . 
one of the few who like to come 
to school in the morning . . . the 
gang at the Eirst Baptist rate- 
high with her. 
Dramatic Club 1; Commercial 4. 




SANDRA THOMAS 
College 7 9 Gardner St. 

"True artists are a rare, 
rare breed." 
Sandy liked 2 o'clock . . . plans to 
go to art school . . . friends are 
Phil and Phiddy . . . wills to room 
203 a new French teacher. 
Art Club 2, 3, 4; Dance Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Senior Dance Com- 
mittee; Sophomore Hop. 




^ 



RICHARD TIBBETTS 

General 16 Maple St. 

"Yet looks he like a king . . ." 

Plans include attending a school 
for T.V. and radio . . . pals are 
Chuck, Dan, and Bill ... to be a 
successful technician is his main 
objective . . . memory is walking 
the corridors with Janet. 
Rifle Club 2; Dramatic Club 4. 



WILLIAM THIESING 

Business 89 Willow St. 

"There is a tide in the affairs of 

men, which, taken at the flood, 

leads on to fortune." 

Bill's goal is a business school to 
study accounting . . . the girls of 
W.H.S. rate high with him . . . 
hopes to get an "A" in his book 
. . . friends are Lucy, Hank, and 
Charlotte. 









Co 

GENO TOMAO 

General 208 Adams St. 

"He's truly valiant." 

Geno plans to work until called 
into the service . . . ambition is 
to be a successful business man 
. . . wills to Jim all his old books 
. . . enjoyed all the fun he had at 
W.H.S. . . . most often with Jim, 
John, and Dick. 




RALPH TOMAO 
College 144 Prospect St. 

"All the world's a stage. And 
all the men and women merely 
players." 
Future plans ... to college to 
study the ways and ideas of people 
. . . ambition: to study politics 
. . . pals are Bill and Rene. 
U.B.I. Class treasurer 2; Class 
president 4; Drama Club 4; De- 
bating Club 2; Executive Council 
4; Legislative 2; Mirror Repre- 
sentative 2; Senior Dance Com- 
mittee 4. 





LUCIANO TOPIA 
Business 48 Oak St. 

"With a solemn tongue he 
did discourse." 
Plans to join U.S. Army . . . take 
a Civil Service Exam tor a police- 
man . . . wills to WHS. his bad 
marks in English . . . liked the 
times when the tenners didn't 
give homework . . . most often 
with Adrian and Tom. 
Art Club 2. 



43 



MYRTLE TUSCHER 

Home Ec. 16 Hovey Rd. 

"Thou sing' st sweet music." 

Plans to work as an assistant to 
a veterinarian . . . enjoyed the 
teachers at W.H.S. . . . Barbara, 
Joanne, and Shirley are her part- 
ners in crime. 
Music Club 2, 3, 4. 




JOANNE UNDERHILL 

Home Ec. 154 Ash St. 

"Beauty doth varnish age." 

Popular Joanne plans to become 

a beautician after graduation . . . 

ringing of the two o'clock bell 

ranked high with Joanne . . . 

Helen, Frances, and Shirley best 

pals. 

Football Usher 4. 




PHYLLIS UNDERWOOD 

College 211 Trapelo Rd. 

"A ivoman's thought runs 
before her actions." 
"Phiddy", of ten seen with Nancy, 
Mai, and Pente, plans to play first 
base for the Dodgers . . 
enjoyed climbing from 
floor to the fourth (? ) . 
Camera Club 2, 3, 4; 
Staff of Mirror 2. 



"Phid 
the first 

Editorial 




College 



C. VAUGHEY 

265 Robbins St. 




"Quietness is best." 
Mary goes to Regis College upon 
graduation . . . Waltham high 
memories . . . talking in studies 
. . . wills to the red brick school 
a new cafeteria . . . pals are Mar- 
jorie, Sandra, and Louise. 
Knitting Club 2; Photo Club 4; 
Library Aide 4; Red Cross Repre- 
sentative 3; Girls' Sports 2. 



HELEN VAGLICA 
Home Ec. 39 Francis St. 

"Come sit down . . . rehearse 
your parts." 
Helen liked best the fun in the 
cafeteria with the gang . . . plans 
to attend Academy Moderne after 
graduation . . . Wills her studies 
in the assembly hall to some 
lucky Junior. 

Baseball 2; Dramatic Club 2; 
F.H.A. 3, 4; Football usher 3, 4; 



Monitor 4. 



N), 



1 




JOANNE WALSI 

College 40 Aberdeen Ave. 

"Your heart's desire be with you." 

Jody's ambition is to attend Sim- 
mons . . . hopes to write for a 
magazine . . . W.H.S. favorite 
was the "swell kids". 
Drama Club 2, 3, 4; Mirror Staff 
4; Newspaper Staff 4; Dance 
Committee 3, 4. 




MARJORIE WALSH 
College 51 Rich St. 

". . . As merry as the day is long." 

Well-liked Margie's ambition is in 
retailing . . . hopes to attend B. U. 
. . . remembers the football games 
— especially the Newton game 
'53. 

Junior Class vice-president; News- 
paper Staff 4. 



44 




EDMUND WHEATON 
Business 319 Warren St. 

"Mine honor is my life; 
both grow in one." 
Ed goes to Northeastern after 
graduation where he'll get a good 
start for his ambition ... a career 
in accounting . . . He wills Miss 
Devane to the junior class. 



ELAINE WILSON 

Business 188 River St. 

"And her sunny locks hang 

on her temples like a 

golden fleece." 

Elaine plans to become an airline 
hostess . . . popular with every- 
one . . . dislikes tardy people, 
noisy girls, likes football, hockey, 
and teachers of W.H.S. 
Cheerleader 3, 4; Knitting Club 2. 




RUTH WILSON 
Business 25 Barnes St. 

"Here is a dear and true 
industrious friend." 
Ruth plans to be a secretary . . . 
she liked the "elevator" best 
about W.H.S. . . . wills to Miss 
Mooney worn down shorthand 
pencils. 
Commercial Club 4. 




ROBERTA B. WISE 

College 75 Fuller St. 

"Music from the spheres." 

Roberta, after graduation plans 
to attend Brandies . . . hopes to 
be a concert singer . . . she likes 
school spirit and wills Mr. Smyth 
the music of the typewriter. 





CHARLES F. WOODS 

Business 85 Pond St. 

"Mine eye and heart are 

at a mortal tear." 

Chuck plans to join the air force 
. . . would also become a C.P.A. 
. . . liked best at W.H.S. Miss 
Mooney's typing class and short- 
hand class . . . wills to Miss Moon- 
ey a set of shorthand machines. 
Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Commer- 
cial Club 4; Mirror Staff 4; Senior 
Dance Committee. 



FRANCIS WITHAM 

College 23 V^ Common St. 

"Our jovial star reigned at 

his birth." 

He liked all the social activities 
. . . ambition ... to be a second 
Harry James and Ed Mikan com- 
bined . . . pals, Charles Woods, 
Dick Lassen, and Dick Johnson 
. . . wants to go to college and 
then become a teacher. 
Band 2, 3, 4; Football 2; Baseball 
2; Treasurer of Junior Class; Boy's 
Vice President of the Executive 
Council 4. 




RICHARD YAROSSI 

Business 186 Charles St. 

"/ have not slept one wink." 

Dick's future plans include the 
Army and then college ... his 
ambition is to be a C.P.A. 




NELLIE YEE 

College 97 Francis St. 

"Those about her from her shall 

read the perfect ways of honor." 

Nell desires to go to college . . . 
ambition is to see the world . . . 
enjoyed W.H.S. the tenderloin 
steak and french fried potatoes 
. . . Nell wills to W.H.S. a bigger 
"cafe". 

Newspaper Staff 4; Literary Staff 
4. 








FRANCES ZAGAMI 
Home Ec. [13 River St. 

"Although the last, not least." 
I ran plans to work for the tele- 
phone company .ittcr graduation 
. . . future plans include marriage 
to Richie and their home in Duxs 
bury . . . wills to sonic luiky 

junior her locker f 1 "0. 



45 



RALPH BANDFIELD 
Trade 

"Constant as the North Star." 

Always has a smile . . . liked by 
all . . . plans to see the world . . . 
pals; Jack and David. 



JAMES BEATON 
Trade 

"O' frowning fortune, fickle 

dame!" 

Likes to tinker with cars ... a 

smile for everyone . . . plans to 

be a successful mechanic. 



ROGER BONVALLAT 

College 5 Cleveland Rd. 

"The fire in the flint shows not 

till it be struck." 

Quiet Roger likes fishing and 
hunting . . . favorite at W.H.S. 
were the football games . . . closest 
friends are Dick, Larry, and Jim. 
Band 2, 3; Orchestra 2, 3. 



ROBERT J. CARNEY, JR. 

Trade 12 Leonard St. 

"It blesseth him that gives . . ." 

After graduation Bob would like 

to be a cabinet-maker . . . leaves 

his late mornings to Mr. Russell 

. . . always with Bob, Paul, and 

Ray. 

Student Council. 



LAWRENCE M. CARROLL 

Trade 31 Allen, St., Lexington 

"Sweet mercy is nobility's 

true badge." 

Plans to work at the automobile 
trade after graduation . . . liked 
the shop work best at W.H.S. 
. . . leaves all his old tools to next 
year's class. 



NORMAN CLARK 

Trade Red Acre Rd. 

"If thou art rich, thou art poor." 

You may soon find yourself walk- 
ing into Norm's tool shop . . . 
ambition is to become a million- 
aire . . . eagerly looking forward 
to graduation. 



ROBERT COXALL 
Trade 

"Frame your mind to mirth 
and merriment." 

Wonderful personality . . . likes 
food and movies . . . shop fiend 
. . . plans to be a millionaire. 



GEORGE GLEDHILL 
Trade Aheln Ave., Sudbury 

"Every why hath a wherefore." 
George's pals include Bob, Ron, 
and Jim . . . after graduation 
wants to work as a machinist in 
Sudbury . . . leaves a monkey 
wrench to next year's seniors. 



NORMAN R. GOSSELIN 



Trade 



22 Browns Ave. 



"He hath eaten me out of 
house and home." 

Norm hopes to be a cabinet-maker 
after graduation . . . wills to Mr. 
Russell his drawing desk . . . 
ambition is to be a millionaire 
. . . W.H.S. memoirs, the school 
and the kids who made it . . . 
his pals; Don, Bob, and Carmello. 
Basketball; Baseball; Student 
Council. 



ROBERT JONES 

Trade 37 Cambria Rd. 

"O fortune, fortune! All 
men call thee fickle." 

Hopes to be a hero in the Army 
and to see the world . . . was a 
member of the Rifle Club . . . 
among his many friends are 
Charlie, Ray, and Joe. 



RALPH HIGGINS 
Trade 359 Bacon St. 

"Ambition should be made of 
sterner stuff." 
After graduation "Higgy" plans 
to join the Armed Forces . . . 
wants to travel . . . leaves his ses- 
sion cards to anyone who wants 



them 
goal 
shop 
Ed. 



happiness is Ralph's 
W.H.S. memoir: the 
Buddies: Roily, Tony, 



m 



ping 

" 



WILLIAM INGHAM 
Trade 

"And keep my droopi 
eyelids open wide: 

Red Sox fan . . . likes music and 
redheads . . . neat dresser . . . 
plans to be a successful mechanic 
. . . friends . . . Steve, Allan, and 
Joe. 







JAMES J. 



\ 

JGH 

Trade 9 Guinan St. 

"We know what we are, 
but not what we may be." 

Plans to go into carpentry or join 
the Marines . . . ambition is to 
drive a tank . . . wills his brains to 
Chuck Ryan. 



RICHARD KERR 

Trade 153 Ash St. 

"Men are April when they woo, 
December when they wed." 

Hopes some day to own his own 
shop . . . maybe soon we'll be 
hearing those wedding bells ring- 
ing . . . liked the eirls best at 
W.H.S. 
Student Council. 



WILLIAM JOHNSON 

Trade 

"Serve always with assured 
trust . . ." 

Very amiable . . . likes music . . . 
one of the gang . . . pals . . . Bob 
and Steve . . . plans to explore 
North Africa. 



PAUL J. LANDRY 

Trade 83 Taylor St. 

"Friends, Romans, Countrymen, 

lend me your ears." 

Paul plans to enter the Navy after 
graduation . . . ambition is to get 
rich quick . . . wills to Ernest his 
rifle . . . friends . . . Herb, Mike, 
and Ernie. 



ROBERT SCHNAIL 

Trade 524 Main St. 

"Through the furrow'd sea 
breasting the lofty surge." 

Will soon be another of our boys 
in blue . . . hopes to become a 
machinist in the Navy . . . Trade 
School was tops with Bob. 



RICHARD SUBICK 

Trade 6 Roosevelt St. 

"Silence is the perfect herald 

of joy." 

Dick will be enlisting into the 
Army after graduation . . . hopes 
to be a truck driver some day . . . 
being in shop was his favorite 
pastime. 
Student Council. 



CHARLES WHALEN 

Trade 15 Seminole Ave. 

"Yet do I fear thy nature; 

it is too full of the milk 

of human kindness." 

Likes Lakeview and the girls . . . 

wants to work in Electro-Products 

if the Draft Board doesn't get him 

first . . . friends . . . Jones, King, 

Beaton . . . ambition to be a tool 

maker. 



ERNEST WINTERKORN 

Trade 175 Lake St. 

'What's mine is yours and what 

is yours is mine." 

Boat-building looks good to him 
. . . would like to leave his "high 
explosive rocket" to Paul Landry 
. . . likes fooling around with 
Paul and Dick. 



46 



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ACT II 

JUNIORS 

"By our remembrances of days foregone" 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT 
Richard Kezer 






VICE-PRESIDENT 
Richard Morrealle 



TREASURER 
Dorothy Ware 



SECRETARY 
Joan McGovern 



Room 017 



First Row: S. Walsh, J. Volpe, D. Whe- 
don, P. Speidel, P. Seigen, A. Walson. 
M. Williams, J. Savage, C. Sallstrom, M. 
Wells, D. Ware. Second Row: R. 
Wheedlon, A. Vitale, W. Sinclair, A. 
Taranto, G. Shirberg, H. Rosenfeld, P. 
Smith, A. Swajian, C. Steraw. Third 
Row: R. Sild, G. Sangelect, H. Stewart. 
J. Worrall, W. Wroth, R. Hendran, S. 
Swain. Fourth Row: K. Walsh, D. Ban- 
ton, S. Shaw, R. Siverson, J. Holland. 
K. Whitney. 





Room 106 



First Row: M. Hayes, C. Feeley, M. Gal- 
lant, H. Rivers, M. Priest, G. Bussey, M. 
Mollica, N. Neffinger, S. Vitti, J. Ember- 
ley. Second Row: S. Robinson, B. Favre, 
B. Smith, C. Nelson, B. Devlin, H. Rear- 
don, R. Graceffa, E. Crowley, E. Bengt- 
son, B. Kenneson. Third Row: B. Spilva, 
N. LaFort, B. Walsh, C. Lazaro, G. Cur- 
tis, A. Cochrane, F. Adams, M. Kezer, A. 
Bailey, J. Hunter. Fourth Row: J. Scalia, 
A. Beninati, B. Lanctot, R. Conrad. 



Room 107 



Second Row: A. Demeo, A. Lahey, P. 
Schuafus, N. Cappadona, J. Famosi. 
First Row: J. Duddy, P. Zeolla, M. Sen- 
ior, F. Salamone, M. Varley, J. Nutile, 
C. MacQuarrie. 




-•*>■«' 



1, 












*1 




R 



oom 



108 



First Row: B. Shanklin, V. Fay, P. Wells. 
A. Tierney, C. Phelan. Second Row: E. 
Rice, J. Tedesco, P. Spaulding, A. Mor- 
rison. 



Room HI 



Front Row: J. Lazaro, M. Leone, S. Wal- 
lace, P. Lopez, M. Snow, R. Helstrom. 
M. Townscnd, C. Qua#liozzi, C. Lazaro. 
J. Lillibridge. Rear Row: W. Coombs, 
J. DeWolfe, A. Miller, E. Silveira, C 
MacQueen, P. Messina, L. Scafidi, C 
Czedik, G. Pereira. 




'.laT. 



Si 



-A> V 



m 



L 



Room 202 



First Row: J. Dougherty, V. Dangel- 
mayer, L. Custer, J. Douglass, M. Horan, 
J. Daniels, E. Fahey, J. Davidson, M. 
Docherty. Second Row: R. DesForge. 
B. Curran, S. Duffey, I. Dowling, S. 
Fienman, R. Cooper, F. Dickinson. Third 
Row: J. Costa, J. Farrell, E. Cameron. 
L. Eglites, R. Dupere. Fourth Row: A. 
DeWolfe, D. Farrell, D. Eagle. 



Room 203 



First Row: B. Fulton, R. Halloran, E. 
Knous, J. Gordon, B. Gallagher, M. 
Hart, B. Hoggan, M. Gallinaro, M. Gav- 
olio, C. Jansen, D. Goolkasian. Second 
Row: W. Gentile, D. Hapgood, R. Isaac- 
son, A. Frizzell, B. Johnson, J. Heath, 
Y. Gurney, C. Hamilton, R. Johnson, 
H. Grenier, R. Herring. Third Row: L. 
Kelly, P. Koutoujian, R. Kezer, R. Gul- 
lotti, R. Fitzgerald, J. Gracey, R. Graves, 
E. Larkin, T. Girolamo, S. Krol, H. Kel- 
ley. 





Room 205 



First Row: F. Parsons, F. Scalia, E. Dan 
forth, B. Marcoux, J. Emerson, J. Vin- 
cuilla, E. Crowe, D. Beck, C. Rizzo, C. 
Swain, E. O'Neill. Second Row: E. Def- 
fely, A. Powers, C. Chase, J. Ferranti, F. 
Kenney, B. Schoener, E. Beley, L. Russo. 
Third Row: N. Doucette, M. DeFlorio, 
E. DeFlorio, B. Greaves, S. Gangi, B. 
Bomengen, B. Finnerty, D. Aucoin, S. 
Doherty. Fourth Row: N. Cavanaugh, 
H. Hoglund, L. Bilodeau, R. Carney, R. 
Dion, C. Aucoin, P. Schofield, W. Cor- 
coran. 



L^"Tfr 



Room 208 



First Row: D. Marshall, R. Meserve, J. 
McGovern, L. Miller, J. Manning, A. 
MacAskill, N. McAdam, F. Maguire, A. 
LeBlanc. Second Row: R. Milligan, A. 
Miller, R. Mason, J. Mahoney, J. Mac- 
Nichol, J. Levey, D. MacLean, R. Meyers. 
Third Row: R. Mailly, C. McLaughlin. 
H. McDonald, P. Mitchell, D. Melanson. 
T. Loynd, R. McLeod. Fourth Row: R. 
Minard, P. Mobilia, C. McLean, W. 
Marhall, W. Meade, W. Medeiros, F. 
Lopez. Firth Row: T. McGovern, A. Lee. 







■ 




"F 



«** 




1 





1 
. .' 1 


K3f*"- 


E 



y 




*£k 







Room 213 



First Row: J. Putnam, R. Pittman, A 
O'Donnell, L. Rand, B. Reilly, L. Poirier 
R. Robillard, S. Nazar, S. Porter, J. Rog 
erson, C. Neville. Second Row: P. Rig 
oli, W. Pittman, M. Ridenti, G. OHara 

D. Petterson, R. Rhodes, W. Regan, E 
Richardson, E. Pomphrett. Third Row 

E. Pecce, A. Mosca, D. Nugent, B 
Brown, R. Morreale, J. Flynn, R. Alt 
man, F. Rando. Fourth Row: P. Neelon 
D. Rice, J. Pearson, J. Moran, W. Nord 
strom. 



Room 311 



First Row: S. Conroy, C. Cohn, M. Co- 
civera, M. Benoit, M. Brown, K. Bon- 
ney, J. Bomengen, B. Charleton, L 
Boyce, S. Burns, H. Anderson. Second 
Row: D. Campbell, B. Alger, E. Carlisi. 
C. Borden, B. Chaplis, E. Bowsen, A. 
Christianson, M. Ash, J. Carruthers 
Third Row: A Collura, R. Comeau, M. 
Buchanan, M. Crame, M. Brown, R. Am- 
orelli, R. Bari, C. Albanese, E. Adams. 
R. Bancroft. 





> 









ACT III 



Sophomore and Freshman 



"To the young eyed cherubins' 






SOPHOMORE 
OFFICERS 



■ 

m 



K. Wile, P. Colangelo, R. Giarrizzo, J. 
Benjamison. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 
OFFICERS 



Left to Right: B. Parkison, L. Douglass, 
M. Brown, D. Cardillo. 



Room 013 



First Row: E. Miller, C. Rogers, J. Rigoli, 
D. Houde, K. Varley, E. Fahey, S. Rid- 
ley, M. Sallstrom, M. Grote, J. Orifice, 
L. Pelletier, S. Bari, M. Malone. Second 
Row: B. Crockett, S. Hatch, M. Mangie, 
B. Doria, S. Enman, E. Defina, N. Poole, 
G. Wallace, B. Gustafson, E. Rockefeller, 
B. Post, E. Collins. Third Row: D. Gilles- 
pie, P. Hannon, N. Girard, J. O'Hallo- 
ran, A. Fanara, J. Gardiner, J. Lucchese, 
A. Dupere, W. Boucher, E. Casey, W. 
Arisman. 




Room 117 



First Row : E. Peterson, E. Parkinson, B. 
Mclver, J. Poirier, H. Meagher, L. Pat- 
ten, M. Norwood, S. Perlmuter, A. Mo- 
rang, P. Owen, M. Murray, D. Murray. 
Second Row: R. Olivio, A. Mergerdi- 
chian, T. Mills, K. O'Reilly, F. Morreale, 
D. Neilson, J. Nisbet, J. Monahan, W. 
Morton, R. Moran, R. McFayden. Third 
Row: J. Murphy, D. Murphy, R. Mazola, 
C. Phelps, T. McGah. 






Room 118 



First Row: D. Gilardi, B. Cincotta, C 
Oliveri, C. Bardsley, B. O'Donnell, J 
Parkhurst, A. Mongeon, D. Campbell 
E. Champion, M. Maselli, M. Hanson 
I. Corrigan. Second Row: L. Flannery 
B. Strader, P. Shea, C. Lowell, P. Mac 
Donald, E. LeBlanc, M. Melanson, V 
Stascavage, M. Dudley, F. Buckman, D 
Dudley, J. Franks. Third Row: A. Has 
sell, J. Gottlander, W. Orifice, M. Wha 
len, M. Paino, B. Mitchell, M. Mort, G 
Mongeon, D. Spencer, T. Monahan, P 
Ianuzzo. Fourth Row: R. LeMay, C 
Cunningham, A. Driscoll. 







1 



'tyP. 




Room 204 



First Row: P. Leonard, E. Lally, C. Mc- 
Laughlin, B. Vantour, L. Papia, C. Pla- 
umbo, M. Lampitella, J. Connelly, P 
Healion, L. Morton, P. Wheanln, P. Par- 
lee. Second Row: C. Stankard, D. Sic- 
otte, J. Wedge, J. Rese, A. Strty, F. 
Shores, J. Sivernson, C. Soburg, R. Man- 
cuso, D. Walker. 






Room 207 



First Row: J. Brightman, M. Brewster, 
J. Bond, A. Barden, M. Carruthers, P. 
Bornstein, J. Carlson, E. Campbell, M. 
Bartleman. Second Row: C. Bergantino. 
J. Buchanan, B. Brown, E. Bullock, P 
Conray, N. Carroll, P. Gallagher, D. 
Campbell. Third Row: G. Allen, C. 
Backman, B. Carlson, R. Boudrot, J 
Beck, A. Auditore, D. Bergenson, H 
Bomengen, R. Boureois, B. Bellis. 



I-.?- 



J 






** 




r> 






Room 211 



Front Row: E. Hoyt, D. Mazzone, S. 
Lazaro, W. Forbes, J. Erikson^ R. Val- 
lucci, S. Suplet, J. Kochenderfer, M. 
Hardy, R. Muller, L. Hanna, F. Ialonga. 
Second Row: J. Benjaminson, P. Colan- 
gelo, A. Larson, C. Barber, C. Conroy, J. 
Petrovick, M. O'Dea, P. Austin, P. Joyal. 
Last Row: C. Phelon, D. Wood, R. Gray, 
E. Clifford, W. Smith, R. Burke, R. Pizzi. 
C. Hill, R. Robinson, T. Hart, A. Scafidi, 
J. Ryan. 



Room 214 



Front Row: C. Everett, A. Wallace, J. 
Lucy, C. Cannistraro, J. Feeley, R. Vin- 
cuilla, E. Lingley, J. Gullotti, C. Krino- 
pol, P. Grimes, S. McGovern. Second 
Row: P. Wheelock, L. McKenney, D. 
McCue, J. Carroll, W. Stanley, C. Lupo. 
D. Webb, L. Cotton, L. Baldwin, J. 
Mattson. Third Row: G. Belleveau, J. 
Confrey, C. Clasby, J. Alterisio, D. Cot- 
ton. 





Room 215 



Front Row: S. Dufford, E. Dunsford, J. 
Creamer, M. Dillon, E. Daniels, E. Du- 
kat, B. Durkee, J. Davis, S. Curtin, I. 
Dormier, M. Cotton. Second Row: P. 
Duffy, B. Coyle, M. Corliss, J. Connelly. 
J. Duffy, R. DeStasio, A. Crowell, W. 
Darby, D. Connelly, R. Derderian. Third 
Row: W. Roberts, W. Connors, J. Don- 
nelly, A. Coye, E. Dowling, J. Rayne, B. 
Scholz, E. DeGregorio, F. Reilly. 



tr 



Room 216 



First Row: A. Ewalt, P. Gage, J. Har- 
rison, B. Green, C. Grenon, M. Ekwall. 
G. Heckman, M. Holl, J. Hills, E. Gran- 
ese, M. Frew, D. Fitzgerald. Second 
Row: D. Forest, R. Ferla, B. Gile, A. 
Harlfinger, R. Giarrizzo, V. Failia, R. 
Hardiman, D. Heplar, R. Hartman, G. 
Earle, R. Hansen. Third Row: A. Fucci, 
A. Erba, R. Fredette. 





Room 217 



First Row: C. Keene, P. Mara, D. Lewis, 
B. Martin, G. Lewis, M. Larson, N. Lin- 
field, H. Kelley, J. Johnson, C. Lane, P. 
Lefebore, N. Holmes, J. Maher. Second 
Row: A. Mabie, B. Laudry, R. LaRosee. 
A. LeBlanc, J. Lukas, D. Kruse, C. Jack- 
son, J. Judge, D. Jansen, L. LeBlanc, R. 
MacLennan, J. Lannon, Y. Lee, N. Mac- 
Lean. 






m 



Room 307 



First Row: M. Raymond, P. Scanlan, R. 
Smith, S. Rietchel, G. Stankard, P. Ryan, 
S. Walsh, A. Quental, M. Wing, B. Ra- 
vesi, C. Thayer, S. Warren. Second Row: 
M. Weagle, J. Shea, S. Taranto, A. Whit 
ney, A. Wentworth, S. Ryan, D. Walsh, 
D. Smith, A. Triconi, S. Walton, D. 
Tranato. Third Row: S. Vasquezi, R. 
Thynaught, C. Wicker, R. Silk, R. Trun- 
kett. 





Room 113 



First Row: M. Burke, N. Young, M. Mc- 
Laughlin, J. Langill, P. Gordan, P. 
Tarahto, J. Piper, C. Nickerson, B. Mc- 
Dermott, N. Partridge, K. Sheehan, R. 
Larosee. Second Row: M. Brown, J. 
Kenny, L. Sullivan, A. Murphy, C. Ran- 
dolph, G. Kelly, R. Bonfilio, J. Steede. 
J. Lee, F. Newfell. Third Row: P. Basle, 
J. Brennan, W. McQuaid, T. Lavash, R. 
Aldred, E. Venini, A. Robins, J. Mac- 
Kinnon, T. Peltonen, R. Squires. 



«*** 



Room 114 

First Row: V. Crapo, J. Carruthers, C 
Freeman, J. Drew, M. Healey, P. Doch- 
erty, J. Murphy, P. Martin, B. Parkin- 
son, J. Murray, M. Fisher. Second Row: 
J. Nelson, S. Cunningham, M. Emslie. 
J. Andrews, C. Dion, C. Leonard, D 
Davis, G. Cross, C. Methot, B. Klimoski. 
Third Row: J. Belodean, M. Clifford, M. 
Gray, B. Mullen, J. Dentino, W. Young : 
G. McGovern, E. Snow, D. MacDougall 
D. Gilligan. Fourth Row: F. Miani, H. 
Childs, J. Gustafson, P. Leshane, H. 
Range, W. Walsh, Mike Place. 




H 


1 




HB> 





^ „ 




Room 115 



Front Row: S. Rowe, R. Jsoan, S. Mac- 
Nabb, S. Campbell, B. Brennan, B. Le- 
Blanc, D. Sullivan, R. Schoener, E. 
Range, C. Nystrom, N. Pittorino, B. Vas- 
salotte. Second Row: C. Hughes, M 
Fenton, M. Morris, C. Bissett, D. Car 
dillo, E. Bari, J. Graceffa, B. Robinson 
C. Krohn, G. Massey. Third Row: M 
Bowse, B. Reardon, J. Questrow, G 
Downing. Fourth Row: R. Hall, R 
Kohler, F. Butler, J. Norton, R. Camp 
bell, R. Queen, J. Lesneski, E. Back, W 
Prussman. 




ll 




SPORTS 



I would applaud thee CO the very echo.' 





First Row: J. Carroll, R. Mara, J. Nisbet, D. Giles, A. Cappadona. Second Row: F. Tiano, J. Confrey, 
J. Levey, R. Landry, S. Krol, J. Deveaux, A. Erba. Third Row: P. Bourque, A. Busceme, M. Brown, 
W. Pitman, A. Mosca, M. Carme, R. Morreale, W. Corcoran. Fourth Row: R. Kezer, J. Judge, A. 
Annunziata, P. Rigoli, W. Simmons, C. Lally. 



QJootbau cJeam 
1953-1954 



FOOTBALL 
CHEERLEADERS 

Standing: A. Smylie. Kneeling: K. Bon- 
ney, E. Wilson, B. Smith, B. Crowe, 
B. Hoggan, S. Schools, B. Shoener, S. 
Natoli, D. Ware, J. Beaton. 



62 







& 



p 



v- 



^ 






r t^lft *"~ Breakaway 

:}■■■ FOOTBALL ^fc| \ • 

"Play out the play" fcP 

Waltham Opponent \ 

Medford 23 ^ 

Fitchburg 7 6 ™ 

Arlington 13 13 

Haverhill 26 6 

Brookline 7 6 

Leominster 6 6 

Newton 31 32 

Somerville 26 7 

139 76 

Won — 5 Tied — 2 Lost — 1 

Coach — Jack Fisher 

Individual Scoring — Tony Busceme — 36 points. 

Mark Brown 36 points. 

Most Valuable Angelo Mosca 

Mark Brown 

Co-Captains — Bob Landry, Angelo Mosca 

• 1 V 










r\^Tr 




ulockey (bquad 

Left to right: R. Peters, M. Brown, R. Bell, S. Krol, R. Brinn, F. Carroll, R. Hardiman, D. Pergola, 
P. Smith, W. Roberts, B. Mullen, Coach Walter Brinn, J. Rice, G. Allen, K. O'Reilly, C. Hill, 
R. Wheeler, J. Judge, J. Farrell, J. Confrey, A. Mergerdichian, C. Moran. W. Pitman, D. Giles and 
H. Childs absent when picture was taken. 



HOCKEY 
CHEERLEADERS 

Standing: C. Borden, V. Dangelmeyer, 
M. Brown, B. Kennyson. Kneeling: J. 
Rogerson, M. Donnelly, V. Campisi, E. 
Bengston, J. Lazzaro. 



64 











\Vhee 



Idea saves m * ^ insf ^ai Poie 

HOCKEY 

"Celerity is never more admired" 

Waltham Opponent 

Needham 1 6 

Wellesley 1 5 

Framingham 1 1 

Norwood 6 2 

Watertown 3 

Walpole 1 1 

B.C.High 3 1 

Walpole 2 

Needham 1 1 

Wellesley 1 1 

20 18 

Coach — Walter Brinn 

Co-Captains — Ken O'Reilly, Ray Bell 

High Scorer — Jack Farrell 

Won — 3 Tie — 4 Lost — 3 





O'Reilly 



scores 



Pitm&n 



allies *£ 



. « C H'»P h 




UjcLsketbail est 



earn 



Front Row: A. Mosca, T. Girolamo, H. Pinstein. Back Row: R. Kezer, H. Kelly, R. Lassen, L. Le 
Blanc, T. McGovern. 



Tense moment 



66 




BASKETBALL 

"Youth is full of sport" 

Waltham Opponent 

Belmont 58 52 

Salem 68 57 

Everett 55 45 

Somerville 40 65 

Arlington 72 56 

Rindge 53 60 

Brookline 47 36 

Newton 48 50 

Cambridge 66 48 

Watertown 48 40 

Watertown 41 49 

Arlington 74 49 

Cambridge 66 48 

Brookline 59 57 

Newton 66 52 

Brockton 42 51 

Rindge 57 51 

Somerville 44 79 

Won— 12 Lost — 7 

Coach — Arthur Quinn 

Co-Captains — Paul Fitzgibbon, Tom Girolamo 

High Scorer — Leo LeBlanc 295 Points 

for a new record for Waltham 



McGovern leaps 




67 



Keep this remembrance" 




BASKETBALL 

Back Row: R. Bourque, J. Hart, R. 
Thompson, E. Boveson, G. Gould. Front 
Row: F. Keirstead, A. Mazzarini, Coach K. 
Harding, L. Scafidi, L. Connelly. 



BASEBALL 

"Let each man do his best' 

Waltham 

Newton 1 

Cambridge 1 

Rindge Tech 7 

Brookline 7 

Arlington 7 

Arlington 4 

Watertown 1 

Watertown 5 

Rindge Tech 11 

Brookline 2 

Newton 4 

Cambridge 

50 

Won — 5 Lost — 7 

Coach — Jack Leary 
Hitting — Tom Collins 309 



Opponent 
7 

8 
8 
1 
5 
4 
4 
6 
5 
3 
12 



63 



Won — 11 Lost — 10 

Coach — Kenneth Harding 

High Scorer — Richard Thompson 459 



Waltham Opponent 

Sudbury 61 45 

Howe High 48 54 

Pawtucket Voc. High 38 42 

Rivers Country Day 60 36 

Howe High 55 65 

Sudbury High 43 49 

Maiden Voc. High 56 46 

Somerville Voc. High 59 38 

Providence Country Day 44 50 

Everett Voc. High 66 43 

Lynn Voc. High 29 55 

Newton Trade 69 43 

Lowell Voc. High 64 45 

Maiden Voc. High 38 42 

Alumni 43 37 

Somerville Voc. High 57 60 

Lynn Voc. High 39 47 

Newton Trade 41 29 

Everett Voc. High 65 39 

Lowell Voc. High 74 44 

Rivers Country Day 39 55 

Totals: Waltham 1088 Opponents 964 



* * ~. 



BASEBALL 

First Row : R. Joyal, R. Landry, H. Kelly, 
M. Carme, R. Beninati, D. Ward, S. 
George. Second Row: J. Piacentino, R. 
Graves, K. O'Reilly, J. Poach, H. Leblanc, 
R. Fahey, D. Purdy. Third Row: D. 
Place, T. Collins, R. Lassen, W. Adams, 
P. Fitzgibbon, P. Anton, T Girolamo. 




- . 









**.-* 




"Y LT ^h tnii 







-1 




• w vw*! Wha^i t 



1 



v a 



••*• 








£:*> 




V 



■> . 







ACTIVITIES 



"And more such days as these to us befall." 




Illirror JLiterary Staff 

"To hold, as 'twere the mirror up to 
nature." 

First Row: J. Colangelo, N. Yee, M. 
Nelson, R. Brinn, M. Pendergast, J. 
Walsh. Second Row: F. Cusack, N. 
Derderian, J. Cornwell, E. Frizell, D. Le 
Fort, J. Ohmemus, L. Johnson, A. Fanea, 
J. Barclay, C. Neville. 



TTlirror (B 



usiness 



Staff 



"A gift that heaven gives for him, which 
buys." 

First Row: S. Perlmuter, J. Gates, D. 
Aucoin, J. Carpentino, L. Jackson, C. 
Borges, L. Kirsch. Second Row: S. Nix, 
J. Martorilli, M. Cocivera, E. Champion, 
L. Cannistraro, M. Frew, M. Mogan, J. 
Walsh, E. Card, P. Conroy, A. Fanara, 
J. Eirskon, D. Cardillo. Third Row: M. 
Larsen, C. Newfell, P. Messelli, J. Corn- 
well, C. Woods, R. Tibbets, R. Richards, 
R. Mobilia, B. Coluci, J. Colangelo. 




nitting 




I lewspaper Column 
Staff 

"Some joyful news at hand." 

First Row: C. Campion, A. Collins, D. 
LeFort, C. Neville, V. Campisi, M. Mula, 
M. Nelson, J. Colangelo, M. Donnelly, 
J. Ohnemus. Second Row: N. Yee, E. 
Frizzell, N. Derderian, I. Dowling, H. 
Meagher, J. Barclay, M. Gavolio, M. 
Hayes, J. Lazaro, P. Walls. Third Row: 
M. Cocivera, C. Borges, M. Frew, B. 
Klimoski, J. Walsh, S. Powden, L. Jack- 
son, M. Pendergast, M. Norwood, K. 
Wile. 




A 






t* M 




Cafeteria Work 



ers 



Seated : J. Emerson, C. Neville, M. Frew, 
E. Tierney, E. Deffely. Standing: J. Corn- 
well, W. Lavash, S. Swain, K. Whitney, 
J. Moran, D. Johnson, A. Genova. 



Commercial Club 

Gffu 



icers 



"To business that we love." 

Left to Right: Gustafson, J. Bond, J. 
Mattson, S. Beninatti, J. MacLeod. 




« 



•iO 



r i 



Jjebatuuj C tub 

"Suit the action to the word, the word 
to the action." 

Seated: G. Lane, K. Wile, J. Gracey, M. 
Frew. Standing: R. Trunkett, B. Giles, 
A. Whitney. M. \X ing, N. Derderian, 
li. Frizzcl, R. Derderian. H. Stewart. E 
Larkin. 



73 



vbxecutive Council 

"Let them obey who know how to rule." 

First Row: R. Franks, J. Carpentino, M. 
Nelson, F. Witham. Second Row: R. 
Kezer, R. Brinn, J. Martorilli, R. Tomao. 





(junior dtomeroom 
JLegislators 

First Row: B. Shanklin, C. Janson, F. 
Kenney, N. Cappadona. Second Row: P. 
Smith, M. Brown, R. Morreale, D. Far- 
rell. 



Senior uTomeroom 
JLegislators 

Front Row, Left to Right: A. Fanara, N. 
Yee, E. Card. Rear Row, Left to Right: 
S. George J. Cornwell, R. Joyal, J. Poach. 




(1 



o 



A 



r*> 



Sophomore 
uTomeroom JLegislators 

Seated, Left to Right: E. Rockefeller, E. 
Dukat, C. Oliveri. Standing, Left to 
Right: K. Wile, A. Auditore, W. Lee, 
J. Nisbet, P. Brown. 



/ > 




■ 



\bxchancje Lonumttee 

"I will go meet them.'' 

First Row: J. Ohnemus, A. Busceme, J. 
Peel. Standing: W. Adams, R. Tomao. 



f/loni. 



tors 



First Row: J. Gates, M. Pendergast, L. 
Gately, B. Jensen, C. Woods, D. Brown, 
B. Dupae, H. Vaglica. Second Row: J. 
Lowell, J. Caswell, J. Martorilli, L. Cor- 
mier, A. Gustafson, J. Campbell, J. 
Ohnemus, J. Gallant, T. Humphreys. 
Third Row: C. Newfell, G. Coluci, R. 
Geofrrian, F. Mobila, R. Benjaminson, 
W. Ford, P. Murphy, J. Cornwell, W. 
Richardson, W. Docherry. 





(btudent JLtb 



ran fins 



"Come, and take choice of all my 
library." 

First Row: C. Sawin, J. Hills, R. Wise, 
G. Dunn, H. Kelly. Second Row: M. 
Frew, J. Walsh, J. Harrison, I. Dowling, 
C. Cannistraro. 



JJance Committee 

"A place next to a king." 

First Row: S. Thomas, B. Brynning, C. 
Janson, M. Nelson, J. Walsh, J. Car- 
pentino, Y. Lee. Second Row: J. Ohne- 
mus, J. Walsh, B. Adams, R. Tomao, L. 
Monahan, M. Pendergast. Third Row: 
W. Fraize, G. Shriberg, W. Regan, L. 
Johnson, D. LeFort, R. Lassen, R. Brinn. 



r\ 




ty 



Ay\ 





I Lational dionor 
(Society 

"Fearless minds climb soonest unto 
crowns." 

First Row: E. Frizzell, D. LeFort, M. 
Pendergast, R. Brinn, N. Bailey. Second 
Row: Miss Gearan, M. Nelson, J. Ohne- 
mus, N. Derderian, B. Brynning. Third 
Row: W. Fraize, D. Lassen, L. Johnson. 



uXnitting Club 

First Row: M. Mangie, Judy Putnam, 
P. Conroy, S. Hatch. Second Row: M. 
Raymond, C. Borges, Miss Balch, D. 
Ware, V. Danglemayer, C. Borden, K. 
Bonney. Third Row: M. Gavolio, P. 
Gavolio, P. Gallagher, E. Bowser, E. 
Defina, L. Custer, M. Walls. 



*YLrt Club 



"Mine eye hath play'd the painter." 
First Row: J. Petrovitch, E. O'Neil, B. 
Brynning, S. Thomas, C. Conroy. Second 
Row: J. Carroll, W. Regan, P. Reilly, 
L. Beer, R. Norcross. 



Jjramatic Club 
(Officers 

"The play's the thing." 

A. MacAskill, C. Woods, D. Farrell, J. 
Ohnemus, R. Tomao. 



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76 




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\j,lee Club 



When I hear sweet music. 





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"Sit down and feed. 



First Row: W. Richardson, W. Docherty, 
D. Lelieve. Second Row: J. Brennan, D. 
Clasby, A. Busceme. 



■ 



cJech C lu 6 

"Every why hath a wherefore." 

First Row: W. Fraize, A. Genova, F. 
Cusack, R. Lassen, R. Berard, D. LeFort. 
Second Row: J. Cornwell, J. Cail, H. 
Rosenfeld, G. Coluci, P. Mobilia. Third 
Row: R. Bell, A. Collura, J. Worrall, 
A. Swajian, J. Farrell. 




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First Row: C. Lazaro, E. Haynes, P. 
Scott, D. LaRosee, E. Dukat. Second 
Row: B. Green, A. Ewalt, P. Austin, C. 
Thayer, R. Meserve. Third Row M 
Lally, R. Yarossi, D. Dclancy, D. Cus.ino. 
S. Natoli. 



77 



Jjrania Club Lrlau 
Cast 

"A stage where every man must play a 
part." 

Sitting: B. Alger, D. Jones, J. Hapenny. 
First Row: R. Tomao, F. Landry, J. 
Ohnemus, B. Adams, M. Benoit, J. Fer- 
rera. Second Row: C. Janson, R. Brinn, 
B. Curran, P. Fitzgibbon, B. Chaplis, E. 
MacNeil, C. Woods, C. Griff, A. Vitale, 
S. Duffy. 



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LKed Cross 
IKepresentatives 

"More merit is in your bounty." 

First Row: E. O'Neill, N. Bailey, R. 
Caissie, J. Gallant, H. Meaher, C. Neville. 
Second Row: B. Dupae, J. Sawicki, I. 
Gilbert, S. Supplit. Third Row: G. 
Shriberg, C. Cunningham, J. Farro. 



"Tis modesty that makes them seem 
divine." 

First Row: S. Monks, J. Underhill, H. 
Vaglica. Second Row: J. Lowell, C. Basle, 
F. Zagame. 



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m- - m 



Science Club 

"Those gold candles fixed in heaven's 
air." 

First Row: D. Davis, C. Freeman, J. 
Drew, J. Andrews, E. Venini. Second 
Row: Mr. Brainerd, J. Questrom, C. Zag- 
wyn, F. Butler. 






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"Know the world." 

First Row: G. Dunne, H. Stewart, H. 
Anderson, J. Gracey, C. Janson. Second 
Row: A. ODonnell, R. Halloran, J. 
Duffy, M. Horan, M. Goodhue. Third 
Row: H. Rosenfeld, A. Coyne, J. Wor- 
rall, L. Kelly, D. Smith. 



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LOra matte L^/tio 
IPlay (committee 

"As you like it." 

First Row: W. Nordstrom, M. Pender- 
gast, J. Walsh. Second Row: D. Farrell, 
F. Mobillia, J. Barclay, N. Bailey, V. 
Campisi, C. Neville, M. Cocivera. Third 
Row: C. Woods, R. Tomao, M. Mogan, 
P. Fitzgerald. 




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[Photography CA/o 

First Row: L. Pelletier, C. Nickerson, 
N. Poole, J. Orifice, G. Downing, E. 
Robinson, E. Range, J. Graceffa. Second 
Row: Mr. Perkins, C. Krolys, E. Collins, 
E. Rockefeller, G. Wallace, C. Rhodes, 
P. Ravesi, J. Anderson, M. Burke, B. 
Douglas. Third Row: A. LeBlanc, R 
Ferlu, J. Moran, C. Stankard, J. Maillet, 
R. Cooper, F. Lopez, R. Moran, S. 
Waken. 



[Photography Cn/w 

First Row: P. Underwood, J. Hayes, N. 
Yee, F. LeBlanc, G. O'Hara, A. Genova. 
Second Row: I. Gilbert, P. Masselli, A. 
Gentile, G. Sangeleer, C. McLaughlin, R. 
Robillard, Mr. Perkins. Third Row: R. 
Altman, P. Dunklee, W. Nordstrom, L. 
Johnson, E. Wheaton, C. Czedick. 







L^afetena Staff 

Mrs. Golway, Mrs. Holmann, Mrs. Fox, 
Mrs. Sheeney, Mrs. Leach, Mrs. Murphy. 




Front Row: R. Graceffa, J. Underhill, 
J. McMinimum, H. Vaglica, N. Fries. 
Second Row: N. Cappadona, F. Zagame, 
P. Schaufus, M. Hill, L. Cormier, I. 
Gilbert. 



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CLASS WILL 



Be it known that we, the Class of 1954 of Wal- 
tham Senior High School, being of sound mind and 
in full possession of our faculties (except when we 
occasionally forget ourselves and do too much home- 
work), do assert and declare this document to be our 
last will and testament. After the full payment of our 
just debts and the discharge of all obligations incurred 
while at Waltham High School, we do hereby be- 
queath and distribute our possessions as follows: 

To Mr. Sheehy, our genial and understanding 
headmaster, who has helped us with our many prob- 
lems, who has saved us from countless sessions when 
we were underclassmen, and who has guided us 
through our senior year in his capacity as headmaster, 
we leave our sincere appreciation and heartfelt thanks. 

For Mr. May, our competent master, we are in- 
stalling an air-conditioning system to counteract the 
heat generated in Room 210, and an addition to 
Room 208 for bigger and better sessions. 

To Miss Woodward, who for three years has been 
our friend and adviser, we give our utmost appre- 
ciation for all her help and guidance. 

Miss McGrath, the "Miss Brooks" of Waltham 
High, is presented a can of ski wax to keep her skis 
in tip-top condition throughout the long summer 
months. 

Mike Cataldo is bequeathed to Miss Betts to 
brighten up those dull moments during French class. 

To Miss Sewall we will an active and successful 
senior girls' basketball team. 

We present to Mr. Brinn an ultra-modern indoor 
skating rink so that those 5:00 A.M. trips to the 
Arena (which the hockey players so enjoy) may be 
avoided. 

For Mrs. Sanford we have engaged a corp of as- 
sistants to round up those long overdue library books. 

Mrs. Windsor receives an extra period each morn- 
ing in which to complete her endless attendance 
duties. 

For Mr. Brainerd we have ordered an electric 
heater to remove that early morning chill from Room 
311. 

A candy bar and cooky dispenser are presented to 
Mr. Ryan to help relieve the hunger pains that come, 
between breakfast and lunch. 

For Mr. Elliott we arc building a room to call his 
own — one in which the Student Council may meet 
without interruption. 

To Mr. Dwycr, the Waltham High counterpart 
of Cecil B. DeMille, we bequeath a group of sopho- 



more boys to replace the fast-diminishing supply of 
promising actors in the Dramatics Club. 

To Mr. Clark we present a book of German Christ- 
mas carols to lend variety to the Christmas program. 

We bestow upon Mr. Morang a hard-working 
Junior Prom committee that will attend all meetings 
and will finish the decorations before the day of the 
Prom. 

For Mr. Smyth we have ordered a life-time sub- 
scription to the Mirror in order that he may never 
forget our yearly masterpiece. 

Miss Balch receives a portable television set on 
which she may watch "My Friend Irma" to see how 
a secretary puts her filing course to good use. 

To Mr. Fisher we leave a football team that will 
show Newton that Waltham never gives up. 

For Mr. Hood, one of the most loyal of Dartmouth 
alumni, we have purchased a can of Dartmouth-green 
paint with which to re-decorate Room 015 so that 
he may constantly be reminded of his Alma Mater. 

An ample supply of needle threaders goes to Mrs. 
Sparks for the use of sophomore girls who can't seem 
to manipulate the simple tools of a homemaker. 

To Miss Gcaran we leave "Herman", the mechani- 
cal man, who reads every newspaper, listens to every 
radio broadcast, attends all civic forums, and does 
faithfully his Democracy homework. Having thus 
found the perfect citizen, she will be less likely to 
look for him among her apathetic seniors. 

For Miss Hirst we have a supply of unbreakable- 
test tubes for those students who become so engrossed 
in their experiments that they forget about the fragil- 
ity of glass. 

To the Junior Class we bequeath the challenge to 
surpass our many accomplishments. 

To the sophomores we offer our congratulations 
for having finally found their way through the maze, 
otherwise known as Waltham High School. 

Upon the freshmen we bestow the virtue of hu- 
mility, which is so necessary in an underclassman. 

As co-executors of this will and testament, we 
appoint Miss Chase, Miss Devane, and Mr. Roach. 

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hand 
and seal this eighth day of June in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine hundred and fifty- four. 

The Class of 1954 
Mary Pender u.ist 



81 




cJrade School 



JrLutomobtie ^Jjepartment 



First Row, Left to Right: D. Merrick, J. Harris, R. 
Subick, Mr. J. Brucchi — Instructor (shop), J. Scalia, 
R. Connolly, F. Gray. Second Row, Left to Right: A. 
Mazzarini, R. Frissore, R. Ragno, A. Keith, R. Lane, 
R. Higgins. Third Row (standing) : K. Gray, R. 
Belodeau, J. Krom, T. Cavanaugh, L. Carroll, J. 
Giugno. 




KJlutomobue (^Department 



Front Row, Left to Right: R. Corr, C. Piper, P. Welch, 
Mr. A. Hoyle (related instructor), J. Delaney, R. 
Doyle, R. LaCasse. Back Row (standing), Left to 
Right: R. Kerr, R. Ryan, P. McShane, E. Boreson, 
R. Carroll, E. Clark, J. Hession. 




(carpentry 'Jjepartment 



Front Row, Left to Right: W. Ferry, M. Robert, N. 
Gosselin, Mr. R. Durling (Shop Instructor), L. 
Guerin, P. Landry, R. Dion. Back Row (standing), 
Left to Right: J. Kehoe, J. Hart, G. Gould, W. Ed- 
wardson, E. Winterkorn, J. Ryan, C. Malone. 



Carpentry ^JJepartment 



82 



Front Row, Left to Right: F. Connerney, J. Mogan, 
Mr. S. Russell (Related Instructor), Joseph West. 
Back Row (standing), Left to Right: R. Capoccia, 
E. Ladd, W. Noyes. 




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LsO-operative 1 1 iachi 



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Front Row, Left to Right: J. Beaton, R. Johnson, 
R. Smith, R. Ingham. Back Row (standing;, Left to 
Right: Mr. D. Cogoli (Shop Instructor), R. Grimes, 
F. Ceilee. 



1 1 Lachine [Department 



Front Row, Left to Right: D. Tuttle, R. Lawrence, 
J. Hapenney, Mr. J. Westall (Shop Instructor), G. 
Allen, E. Doucet, N. Cahill. Back Row (standing), 
Left to Right: J. Hovsepian, W. Norton, R. Petrula- 
vage, P. Daigle, J. Cain, J. O'Brien, E. DiGregorio. 





1 1 lachine Department 



Front Row, Left to Right: G. Murphy, R. Beaudet, 
E. Laviolette, Mr. L. Van Arsdale (Related Instructor) , 
R. Shea, J. Ragno, H. Hansen. Back Row (standing). 
Left to Right: H. McDonald, J. Billard, G. Gledhill, 
R. Bourque, R. Stever, D. Davies, H. LeBreton, C. 
Lane. 



[Printing 'Department 



Front Row, Left to Right: J. Vaughey, E. Rose, R. 
O'Reilly, R. Hynes. Back Row (standing), Left to 
Right: R. Savoy, J. Maloney, R. DeSaulnier, J. Bakun, 
T. Maloney. 




vi/elcling [Department 



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Front Row. Left to Right: Mr. K. Harding (Related 
Instructor), J. Swenson, W. Jones, R. Dcnnison, R 
Pintahone, K. Shores, Mr. J. Lchanc (Shop Instna 
tor). Middle Row, Left to Right: D. LeBlanc, W. 
Sperry, H. Perry. J. Arri«o, J. Coluci. F. Kierstead, 
W. Nelly, J. Malone, A. Van Horn. 
Back Row (standing). Left to Right R. Morris, 1 
McBride, E. Shaw, J. Piecenrino, R. Thompson, R. 
Guy, R. Bourgeois, F. Fairfield. 



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o trior row 



"Are we prepared to face tomorrow?" 
Cry America's youth today. 
"Will our training for life be complete 
On our June Graduation Day?" 

When we entered our sophomore year, 
Korea was the name we heard. 
We laughed and tried to enjoy ourselves 
To forget that menacing word. 

But soon the word was reality, 
An era of blood and strife; 
A war waged in a distant land 
Was claiming American life. 

In our junior year Williams returned; 
Trouble flared up in Trieste. 
We all were whistling "Oh Happy Day" 
In a world of sober unrest. 

American voters all "liked Ike"; 

The Braves left Boston scene. 

The water rushed through Holland's dikes, 

And Britain crowned Elizabeth, Queen. 

While we danced to the Bunny Hop, 
A Korean truce was the news; 
The war that youth had fought to win 
They did neither win nor lose. 

The dances, parties, games, exams 
In our fleeting senior year 



Kept us from thinking much about 
A future stern and drear. 

But in the midst of our merriment 
We must realize one thing; 
America's future is ours to mold; 
Her anthem is ours to sing. 

Somewhere in a distant year 
There must be a golden life, 
Free from hate and free from fear 
And free from war and strife. 

But the road ahead is steep and rough 
And very hard to climb, 
Yet a distant trumpet summons us 
To make this march of time. 

Are we ready to march with fortitude 
Into a gray tommorrow? 
To accept this challenge courageously 
And conquer fear and sorrow? 

With Graduation fast approaching 
This thought we must not bar; 
America is calling forth her youth, 
And America's youth we are! 

"Yes, we're prepared to face tomorrow," 
Cry America's youth today. 
"We'll serve and we'll fight and we'll triumph 
And bring Peace to the world some d.u 

RONALD BRINN 
Class Poet 



85 



CLASS PROPHECY 



1954 



It was a balmy, April evening in Washington, and from 
the terrace of my penthouse where I rested in my Bryning 
contour chair, I could see the cherry blossoms along the 
misty Potomac. 

The serenity of the night was broken only by the golden 
voice of my next door neighbor, Miss Roberta Wise, who 
was rehearsing her new musical, "Sing Sing", written by 
that eminent composer Donald Lelievre. As I was sipping 
my lemonade, my maid, Justine Mahoney, approached me 
with a message. It read, "Your presence is requested at the 
office of the President of the United States of America at 
10:08 A.M. Matter urgent. Be prompt." 

Yours truly, 

Roseanna Caissie 

Assistant assistant secretary 
to the under-Secretary of State. 

I wondered what President Franks wanted to see me for 
now. When I accepted the position of Special Secretary in 
charge of Unimportant Details, I understood my job to be 
simple and soft. I decided to forget my troubles and get 
some sleep, so I closed the book on my first day in office. 

Tuesday dawned clear and bright, and I eagerly started 
my jaunt to the Capitol. Dick Norcross, the manager of the 
famous Mayflower Hotel, greeted me with a cheerful good 
morning as I left. The doorman called me a cab because my 
Bomengen Sport car was undergoing repair at Tony Mazze- 
rini's garage after an unfortunate collision with that mad- 
cap socialite Nancy Bailey. 

Rounding the corner of Massachusetts Avenue on two 
wheels, I leaned out the window to wave to Senator Ohnemus, 
who was walking her white poodle. As the cab pulled up in 
front of the Capitol, I gathered my courage around me and 
told cab driver Dave Purdy to "charge it." I could hear his 
humble thank you's as I made my way up the several thou- 
sand marble stairs. I hurried through echoing corridors and 
arrived at the President's outer office at 10:06. Receptionist 
Mary Lou Flynn asked if I had an appointment. I assured 
her that I was expected, and with a friendly smile she ushered 
me into the President's office. Behind an enormous desk sat 
President Franks, trying his best to look official. I grace- 
fully parked my Bobby Ball Bubble Gum behind my left 
ear, and we settled down to business. President Franks, in a 
serious voice, announced that every member of the 1954 
graduating class at Waltham High School owed 3 cents on 
his year book. The publishing company was threatening to 
sue. It was my job to collect! I hurried home and with the 
help of my secretary, Janet Mobilia, I looked through a 1954 
Yearbook and the current edition of "What's What and 
Why" written by Dick Tibbetts. 

Upon discovering that a large portion of the Senior Class 
was engaged in colonizing Mars, I began making preparation 
for a trip there. 

The next day I visited Secretary of Interplanetary Rela- 
tions, Lawrence Beer, to secure permission to visit the planet. 
When Under-Secretary-in-charge-of-the-Mars-Project, Bernie 
Mikula, learned of my visit he suggested an inspection tour. 
I hurried to New York to secure reservations on a rocket ship 
from the Gail Rocket Ship Lines. President Gerry Gail was 
very accommodating. He furnished his newest ship, designed 
by Jack Farrell, and one of his finest crews, captained by 
Jimmy Poach. Jim Poach and his crew showed us how to 
adjust our seat belts, and after racing our rockets for several 
minutes, we blasted off. 



Because it was our first rocket trip, we spent the first few 
minutes with our noses pressed to the windows, but there 
was nothing to be seen but an occasional passing meteor. 
Surprisingly, none of us were airsick, but we discovered 
Captain Poach and Co-pilot Don Cook sprawled on the foam 
rubber chairs in the cockpit. Thanks to the competence of 
Stewardess Jean Peel, who had luckily brought along a box 
of dramamine tablets, they didn't suffer long. 

After lunch, we decided to try the new lilac tile swim- 
ming pool, and there squatting on the diving board blowing 
up water wings was life guard Dave LeFort. We exchanged 
a brief hello, collected our 3 cents, and after a few free 
lessons on how to perform the poodle paddle, we went back 
to our cabins to dress for dinner. 

Pheasant under glass was served on the Moonlight 
Lounge, and as I speared a chocolate covered oyster with my 
pickle fork, I glanced up to thank the waitress who was 
passing the hors d'oeuvres tray. Who was it but Judy Gates, 
so I collected my 3 cents and left to fraternize with the other 
guests. 

There on the observation desk I found Spencer George, 
peering at the passing stars through his (Myrtle) Tuscher 
Telescope. Because he seemed so engrossed in his observa- 
tions, I merely collected my 3 cents and left. 

We traveled for a few days before we approached the 
mid-way point, Ye Old Rocketal. Eagerly we disembarked 
and were greeted by Patrick Murphy, owner of the rocketel 
and Tony Genova, famous throughout the Universe for his 
Italian Spaghetti Palace. 

Because we had several hours before the ship was to 
leave, we made a brief tour of the planetoid. We visited the 
Rocketel Bookstore, where we met Ronnie Brinn, Mickey 
Spillane's successor, who was busy autographing copies of 
his latest book "Who Threw The Robot in Mrs. Murphy's 
Furnace," or "Ketchup in the Kitchen". After talking with 
our old classmate and collecting his 3 cents, we bought a few 
things to read on the remainder of the trip and returned to 
the space garage. Patrick informed us that the whole colony 
had been planned by Oberbeck, Dunklee & Company, Ar- 
chitects and was built by the Jim Hart and George Gould 
Construction Company. 

After saying thank you and good-bye, we again blasted 
off. We were about midway between the Rocktel and Mars 
when our navigator informed us that the instruments were 
dead and that we now were flying blind. We must have 
wandered around for two days before a patrol ship from the 
Bumble Bee Squad found us. Super Pinstein, the ace lieu- 
tenant for the squad, and his crew, Bob Dearborn, Geno 
Tomao, and nurses, Elizabeth Frizzell, Mary McLellan, and 
Betty Jensen buzzed aboard. After assuring them that we 
were all right, we asked to be towed to Mars. 

With some difficulty we managed to land on the wide 
expanse of the Docherty Rocketfield. With wild enthusiasm 
we were greeted by a crowd including Mike Cataldo with the 
press card stapled to the propeller on his beanie. He and 
his photographer, Fred Carrol, had been sent by editor Mary 
Mula of the Atomic Press. 

Governor Bill Lavash and a special committee of Martian 
citizens including Shirley Monks and Diane Place waved 
signs saying, "Welcome to Mars." We spent the night in 
the out-patient department of the Mars General Hospital 
where we were treated by Dr. Cornwell for Heliophobia, a 
dangerous disease caused by prolonged subjection to the 
ultra violet rays of the sun. After our x-rays, taken by Nurse 
Michele Lally were reported negative, we were released. 



86 



Proceeding to the Haynes Bubbletel we were greeted most 
cordially by manager Ian Orman, who assigned us our rooms 
and turned over our luggage to bellhops Matilda Mogan and 
Sybil Powden, who pushed the bags along on their jet- 
propelled scooters. Just as we were about to catch up on 
some much needed sleep, Lorraine Kirsch, official envoy 
from the Mars Chamber of Interplanetary Commerce, burst 
in on us and invited us to tour the planet. She ushered us 
to her office at the Kirsch Realty Bubbles. These were the 
homes of the Martian inhabitants because the climate and 
gravity conditions didn't permit houses. There were many 
contestants for the honor of being chief bubble designer, 
but Benny Gardiner, the enterprising young business man. 
was in the lead with his solar heated plastibubbles. 

Miss Kirsch provided space autos for us to travel in, and 
we left to explore Mars. As we rounded the first bend we 
were practically bombed by Fay Griffin, as she came in for 
a landing in her hot rod rocket. As we were exchanging 
excited welcomes, an officer of the Bumble Bee Squad, Allan 
McKinnon screeched up behind Fay, ceremoniously handed 
her a little white ticket, and asked her if she were trying 
to set a record. 

Then we proceeded to view the colony. Coming up in 
the distance we saw tremendous sky bubbles which harbored 
the shopping center. The sight was simply fascinating. As 
We neared the stores we met Ralph Tomao directing traffic 
into his "Park It Here, And Never Fear, Lot." 

As we approached the Laurie Monahan Fashion Center, 
the floor walker, Melvin Casey with a carnation in his button 
hole, ushered us to the manager. Don Cusano extended his 
warmest welcomes and started to explain the layout of the 
store. A dazzling blonde caught our eye, and we found out 
that she was Marion Nelson, who was demonstrating the 
latest products of the "Atomically Yours" Cosmetic Company. 
The display windows were exquisitely decorated by that 
famous artist, Sandra Thomas. Then we went to the third 
floor to see the latest in Martian creations for women. Again 
we met some old school friends, Jackie Carpentino, Pat 
Miller, and Elaine Card, who were modeling fashions for 
space wear. 

The next step on the agenda was the new elementary 
school. There we were introduced to the faculty, some of 
whom we knew already. There was Don Delaney, instructing 
the second graders how to use their space suits. Doris Polley 
was in the auditorium conducting her class on a tour of 
modern art creations. 

The principal of the school, Dick Yarossi, hurried down 
the corridor to make sure we met our old pal, Carol Borges, 
who was in charge of the admission and dismissing of the 
pupils. 

For a long time we had looked forward to visiting the 
famous cadet school universally recognized to be the greatest. 
Breathlessly, we eyed the huge building, surrounded by all 
kinds of ships and military facilities. With an official ges- 
ture the guard, Don Shaw, gave us the come-on, and we 
marched in to see the spotless classrooms of "Apex Point." 
Conducting a large class of young men were Bill Thiesing 
and Joe Salpietro neatly dressed in green uniforms. After a 
short wait the important and ever busy dean of the school 
came to meet us. It was Lennie Johnson looking very happy 
and handsome. 

It was dinner time, and we had been promised a visit to 
the Martian Quarter, where we proceeded to spend an 
evening of relaxation and enjoyment. The first noise that 
greeted us as we entered this ultra modern night club was 
the bill-boarded musicians Dizzy Witham and his Hot 
Rocket Six!!! Dinner was served by Adrian Feeley and 
Joanne Underhill, famous culinary artists. Later three men, 
approached us and asked us to dance. We were so surprised 
to see Rene Berard, Willard Fraize, and Rusty Cusack. As 
we were talking we found out that Willard owned a chemical 
plant and was producing jet propelled sewing machines that 
Rusty Cusack had designed and engineered. Rene was the 



publicity agent and advertising manager for the entire com- 
pany. 

The entertainment continued, and the spotlight caught 
that sparkling personality, Angie Fanara, who sang a few 
numbers including "Just My Beady-Eyed Bill!!!" Next Joan 
Martorilli sprightly leaped out from back stage and graced 
us with a few dances and numbers on the piano. 

Then we spotted Joan Erikson, now an established 
actress, seated at a ringside table with a handsome stranger. 
We went over and exchanged surprised hellos and embar- 
rassed Joan by collecting our three cents. She introduced us 
to her friend, who was Dick Joyal, a famous movie producer 
for the Mars office of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

With a blast from Dizzy Witham's trumpet and a whisk 
of the curtain we beheld a chorus line like the Rockcttes from 
good old New York City. They were billed as the Atomo- 
kettes, and once more we spotted a few old acquaintances in 
the line. They were Shirley Beninati, Jean Caswell and 
Louise Gately, with Tania Humphreys holding the bill card. 
The acrobat of the troupe was Sandra Smith, who did a few 
limb twisting stunts as she introduced the next number. 

With our sacks full of pennies we left for the rocketell 
to get some sleep. 

The next day we rose at the crack of 3:00 P.M. and 
hurriedly dressed for the testimonial dinner given in our 
honor by Mary Pendergast, chairman of the welcoming com- 
mittee. We dashed over to the Richard Perry Auditorium 
and fought off the photographers and reporters from different 
papers. Among them were old school chums Ruth Wilson. 
Grace Collura, and Mary Barrille. 

Charlotte Basle was the cordial hostess who introduced 
us to the socialites and dignitaries. After that we collected 
our three cents from old alumni that we had met so far. 
The society girls Lorraine Jackson and Jean Hapenny were 
seated near us at the head of the table discussing the latest 
developments of the male population growth on the planet. 

The dinner was planned and carried out by the Martian 
League of Women Voters under the direction of Sandra 
Blomberg, chairman. She was ably assisted by a committee 
of experts on politics consisting of Lorraine Bergantino, Jean 
Barnes and Rose Arena. 

After a delightful luncheon the guest speaker of the day. 
Miss Jean Colangelo, queen of the March of Quarters, a 
drive for the cure of the space disease heliophobia, gave a 
short speech. When she had finished she tossed us three 
pennies, and our mission was almost completed. 

With tired minds and happy spirits, we relaxed in trie 
bubblets. After the porter had carried our baggage out to 
the space ship, we threw our penny sacks over our shoulders 
and bade goodbye to all our friends on Mars. We took our 
seats on the rocketship, and much to our surprise the new 
stewardess who came to warn us to fasten our seat belts was 
none other than Nellie Yee. The trip back was pleasant but 
uneventful, and we made a hurried landing on the White 
House lawn. President Franks was, much to the surprise of 
nobody in particular, trying out his new golf clubs in his 
office, newly decorated with Venetian blinds from the corpo- 
ration of Franks, Franks, Franks, and Franks Company, a 
private enterprise of the chief executive. We entered his 
office and solemnly dumped the pennies on his desk, smiled 
politely, handed him our report, and beat a hasty retreat. 

So then it ended. It had been fun while it lasted, but 
we all had other duties to return to. We parted then on the 
White House steps, I to go back to my governmental duties. 
Gennie to her paint brushes, and Jody and Peggy to their 
creative typewriters. At least we had seen once more the 
class that had been "the most to say the least." 

ANN SMYLIE 
assisted by Virginia Campisi 
Peggy Denk 
Joanne Walsh 



87 



i -S 



CLASS HISTORY 



There are those moments in every man's life when he be- 
comes depressed, feeling that the world has turned against him for 
no apparent reason. It is usually then that he uncovers his scrap- 
books and photograph albums, dusts them off, and sits back, hop- 
ing to ease his mind by recapturing the happier moments of the 
past. 

It was on such an occasion that I decided to reminisce upon 
my high school days by looking through my photograph album 
with the pictures of all the affairs which had taken place during 
my three memorable years at Waltham High School. Slowly I 
turried back the cover of time and read the prologue, which I had 
written in 1951: 

"The following pictured events took place during the years 
1951 through 1954, and each one is, in itself, a memory to be 
treasured forever." 

Turning to the first page, I expected to see many familiar 
faces, but, to my surprise, the pictures appeared as nothing but 
indiscernible blurs, and I had great difficulty in distinguishing the 
students from the faculty members. Why? Were my eyes failing 
me in my old age? I pondered for a moment, and then I remem- 
bered. At that time, all pictures were "3-D", and "3-D" glasses 
were needed to perceive these photos. So, I adorned specified spec- 
tacles and proceeded once more into the days of yesteryear. 

On the opening page was a candid of the bewildered sopho- 
mores eagerly clutching their pencil cases as they entered a new 
phase of education in their lives — high school. Yet, their faces 
seemed to be more intelligent than those of previous sophomore 
students, and as I remember, we had tried to prove just that by not 
losing our way in the labyrinth of corridors, by taking the correct 
lunch, and by proceeding up and down the specified stairways. 

After a few weeks of being alone, we were honored by the 
upperclassmen at the Sophomore Get- Acquainted Dance. A photo 
showing our gymnasium transformed into an autumn forest caught 
my eye, along with candids of Warren Harding, guest disc jockey 
for the affair. 

Next, I viewed many photos of our high school eleven as we 
managed to shade six of our opponents in the fall of '51. In one 
picture were the sophomore members of the squad who strove 
diligently to aid Waltham High in becoming a top team. 

Many snapshots of our sophomore girls, attired in fall and 
winter fashions which they modeled in the semi-annual Simplicity 
Fashion Show, appeared on the next two pages. 

A lone photograph of the students whom we had chosen to 
guide us through our first year of high school life adorned the fol- 
lowing insert. The officers were Ronald Brinn, president; William 
Lavash, vice-president; Jean Colangelo, secretary; and Ralph 
Tomao, treasurer. 

On page eight, many of our sophomore dramatists shown with 
the upperclassmen in the annual presentation of the Dramatics 
Club entitled The Little Dog Laughed, seemed to be happy acting 
in their first high school play. 

No sooner had fall and the football season departed than win- 
ter and the basketball and hockey season began. Thomas Girolamo 
was the lone sophomore on the varsity basketball team, but with 
him in a photo of the team were the others who had played with 



the junior varsity. Hockey gained added interest that year, partly 
because it was the first year we had hockey cheerleaders. Sopho- 
more girls pictured on the cheerleading squad were Joan Bond, 
Nancy Bailey, and Virginia Campisi. 

Large photos of "Alice in Wonderland" had been taken at the 
annual Mirror Dance in January, 1952. There, in all her splendor, 
was Alice, otherwise known to us as Marion Nelson, our Class 
Day Queen. 

The snapshots which followed were outlined in silver paint, 
for they were memories of the most important event of the sopho- 
more year — the Sophomore Hop. Pictured under a circus tent 
were Ronald Brinn, general chairman, and his hard working com- 
mittee. 

Completing the pages of my sophomore year were many 
photographs of the ambitious and interested students who had 
served on various committees throughout the term. Most important 
were the following legislators on the Student Council: Leonard 
Johnson, William Simmons, Jacklyn Carpentino, Frank Witham, 
Edward Clark, Anthony Busceme, Benjamin Gardiner, Shirley 
Schools, and James Mula. 

The fall of 1952 brought a new feeling of contentment and 
joy to us, for we were no longer sophomores. Refreshed from our 
summer vacation, we embarked upon our junior year. 

Our growth over the summer months was apparent in a 
photograph of our football squad whose members resembled 
mammoth giants, eager to crush our opponents in the 1952 cam- 
paign. 

The picture of the junior class officers was, again, on a page 
by itself, for these scholars were chosen as our leaders; Robert 
Frank, president; Marjorie Walsh, vice-president; Mary Pender- 
gast, secretary; and Frank Witham, treasurer. 

Many memories of a wonderful production were brought to 
mind when I turned to the next page and saw pictures of the 
Dramatics Club play, Curtain Going Up, and of all the junior 
actors and actresses who participated. 

Winter once again, I could guess, from the photos of the 
basketball and hockey squads as they prepared to launch their 
1953 campaign. Numerous junior boys played on these victorious 
teams. 

More pictures of the 1953 Mirror Dance followed, and every- 
one appeared to be enjoying himself. 

In March, 1953, many students at Waltham High School 
participated in an operetta presented under the direction of Mr. 
Raymond Crawford. Pictured with him was Mr. Richard Dwyer, 
who offered able assistance in the coaching of the dramatics por- 
tions of the production. 

Another memorable event in the junior year occurred on 
May 12, 1953, when twelve worthy students were selected as 
members of the National Honor Society. A photograph of these 
proud, beaming students highlighted the pictures on the follow- 
ing pages. 

Many empty pages caused me to believe that I had reached 
the end of my pictorial journey, but, to my enjoyment, I discov- 
ered that this blankness was introducing the most joyous social 
occasion of the year — the Junior Promenade. Standing amid the 



If 



90 



glitter of sparkling gowns and handsome tuxedos was Mr. Morang, 
faculty adviser for this dance. Another photo of the grand march 
showed Student Chairman Donald Cusano and the other mem- 
bers of his committee dancing to the music of Herb Card's orches- 
tra. 

On the closing pages of our junior year were many pictures 
of miscellaneous origin. There was a snapshot of Willard Fraize 
receiving the Harvard Book Award, a presentation to the most 
scholarly junior boy. Also pictured were Mary Mula, elected 
editor of the 1953-1954 newspaper column, and Ronald Brinn, 
selected editor-in-chief of the 1954 yearbook. 

As Graduation drew nearer, we were sorry to have our "big 
brothers and sisters" leave us, yet we were happy to have reached 
our goal — our senior year. 

Elected to serve as Senior Class officers were Ralph Tomao, 
Joan Beaton, Janet Ohnemus, and Rene Berard as president, vice- 
president, secretary, and treasurer, respectively. A picture of this 
group standing at the open doors of WHS on the first day of 
school opened the third and most memorable chapter of my photo- 
novel review. 

We returned to school on September 9, 1953, with saddened 
hearts, for during the summer months a tragic accident had taken 
the lives of our headmaster and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. 
Huff. Mr. Francis E. Sheehy, our master, assumed the duties of 
headmaster, and we pledged our aid in successfully establishing 
the new administration. 

This year it was our turn to honor the sophomores as shown 
by the candid photos of the Sophomore-Get- Acquainted Dance, 
held in September, 1953. Joan Martorilli, chairman of the Dance 
Committee and her diligent co-workers, formed one picture, with 
Herbie Card and his orchestra in the background. 

On September 26, 1953, we commenced our last football 
season as students of Waltham High School. Candids of various 
positions, plays, and touchdowns were among the many photos 
of the cheering section and our great cheerleaders. Ann Smylie 
was captain, with Shirley Schools, Elaine Wilson, Joan Beaton, 
and Shirley Natoli as senior leaders. 

Early in October, Waltham High School was represented on 
the WHDH Record Poll. Many snapshots showing Ralph Tomao, 
Mary Pendergast, Ronald Brinn, and Jacklyn Carpentino busily 
preparing the ballots and tallying the votes were prominently 
displayed At that time "You, You, You" was the top tune at 
W.H.S. 

Upon returning from our Thanksgiving holidays, we im- 
mediately began rehearsals for the Dramatic Club play, Too 
Young, Too Old. Pictures of William Adams as "Papa" Jordan, 
Frances Landry as Phyllis Jordan, and Mary Mula as "Cindy" 
Wright covered the following pages. 

With Christmas in the air, our exuberant and striving basket- 
ball and hockey teams prepared to have a successful 1953-1954 
season. Many photos of outstanding plays and excited fans were 
among individual pictures of some of the high scorers of both 
teams. 

At this point, an enlarged newspaper clipping caught my 
eye. Nancy Bailey, one of our outstanding seniors, was pictured 
receiving first prize in the nationwide Royal Typewriter Com- 
pany's Essay Contest the subject of which was "What I Expect 
My Education and School Activities to Do for Me." A gold type- 
writer and two hundred dollars in cash were Nancy's splendid 
awards. 



The next portion of my photo album contained the gradua- 
tion pictures of many of my friends, for about this time almost 
everyone had his senior photos taken for the yearbook. 

In January, 1954, Waltham High School was honored to 
have one of its outstanding senior girls, Jean Colangelo, selected 
as Waltham's Miss March of Dimes. Many pictures taken at the 
March of Dimes Ball showed Jean being crowned by Princess 
Ileana of Rumania and being honored by many of her classmates. 

February was a happy, eventful month. Mardi Gras brought 
the atmosphere of outer space into the Waltham High School gym 
in the form of weird decorations of the atomic age, including 
flying saucers and shooting stars. 

As February 19 was the memorable night of my high school 
career, I had saved many photos of the Senior Dance. Leonard 
Johnson, student chairman, along with Mr. May, faculty adviser, 
was pictured with the hard-working committee as they trans- 
formed the gymnasium into a dreamy, moonlit scene of beauty. 
Other candids showed our senior girls, with Stardust in their hair 
dancing with their handsome, well-groomed escorts to the strains 
of Herbie Card's music. 

Concluding the month of February were pictures of Waltham 
High School being feted by the Mass. State Department of Edu- 
cation at a special assembly in Hovey Memorial. The department 
presented us with a coveted award for exemplifying good citizen- 
ship in establishing the Richard S. Huff Memorial Scholarship 
Fund. Ralph Tomao accepted the gift for the High School, and 
Lorraine Jackson received a citation for exceptional individual 
effort. 

In March, worries of College Board Exams penetrated the 
minds of numerous college bound seniors. Various pupils shown 
studying feverishly in their free periods, made me chuckle a bit, 
reminding me of my own experiences. 

April brought spring, vacation, and the Senior Play to W.H.S. 
Candids of the 1954 production, Jumpin Jupiter by Carl Kurtz, 
portrayed Francis "Rusty" Cusack as Bob Wright, Frances Landry 
as Abigail Baker, and Carolyn Griff as Dorothy r reston, in a 
rollicking comedy depicting the trials and experiences of a young 
theatrical group when it became involved with "big time syndi- 
cates." 

Class Day, the final and most anticipated assembly of the 
senior year, portrayed in colorful snapshots all of the 1954 gradu- 
ates marching into the Hovey Memorial auditorium. Also scat- 
tered throughout the pages were many candids of the Class Day 
Queen; the senior "Stardusters"; the class poet, Ronald Brinn; the 
class prophet, Ann Smylie with her committee members Joanne 
Walsh, Peggy Denk, and Virginia Campisi; and the writer of x>ur 
class will, Mary Pendergast. 

As I closed the cover on my book of memories and removed 
my "3-D" glasses, I noticed that the pictures became hazy and 
vague once more. I leaned back, recalling the many pleasant hap- 
penings which I had nevei recorded in my album. I realized that 
the pictures which I had saved were my most priceless posses- 
sions — remembrances of the unforgettable faculty, the social 
affairs, the sports, and the fellow classmates who helped me CO 
complete successfully, three glorious years .it Waltham High 



School. 



Janet Ohnemus 
(lass Historian 



91 





-BABY PICTURES- 1954 



Joan Gallant 
Doris LaRosee 
Helen Vaglica 
Jessie Lowell 
Ian Ormon 
Phyllis Underwood 
Louise Bergantino 
Matilda Mogan 
Jim Poach 
Carol Borges 
Mike Cataldo 
Marylou Flynn 
Louise Bomengen 
Janet Ohnemus 
Betty Jensen 
Sandra Smith 
Ronnie Brinn 
Joan McMeniman 
Naomi Fries 
Mary Anne Harrington 
Faye Griffin 



22. Roseanne Caissie 

23. Angela Fanara 

24. Lorraine Jackson 

25. Alice Gustafson 

26. Sandra Blomberg 

27. Mary Pendergast 

28. Bill Adams 

29. David LeFort 

30. Mary Mula 

31. Fred Carroll 

32. Carolyn Campion 

33. Marion Nelson 

34. Andrea Collins 

35. Dick Joyal 

36. Bette MacQueen 

37. Frances Landry 

38. Judy Gates 
39- Elaine Card 

40. Charles Woods 

41. Anne Smyle 

42. Joanne Walsh 







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"The inaudible and noiseless foot of time steals" 



%*il*$ue 



THE STAFFS EXHAUSTED, NOW THE BOOK IS DONE! 
ALL IS WELL ENDED, IF THIS BE WON: 
THAT YOU EXPRESS CONTENT, FOR WHICH WE TRIED 
OUR BEST TO PLEASE YOU, WORKING SIDE BY SIDE. 
"FINIS CORONAT OPUS": THE FINISH IS THE CROWN. 
WHATEVER THE COURSE, THE END IS THE RENOWN. 
LIKE THE BARD-OF-AVON, WE BEG YOU PRAY WELL; 
"DO YOU NOT AGREE, ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL?" 



All the quotations used in this book were taken from the WORKS OF 
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE. 






93 



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Best Wishes to the Graduating Class of 
1954 



§ 



HENRY A. TURNER 



MAYOR 






Compliments of the Classes 
of 



1954 
1955 
1956 



X^^S^t^V^'v 



94 



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Plumbing and Heating 
Appliances 

Tel. Be. 5-6037 — 5-6038 

O. J. COLANGELO 
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258 TRAPELO ROAD 
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Compliments of 

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111 SUMMER STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Caps and Gowns For Sale and Rent 

Tel. Liberty 2-7930 



Compliments of 



R. S. WILDER, INC. 



26 BEDFORD STREET 



WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



WALTHAM CLEANERS 



3-Hour Cleaning — No Extra Charge 



750 Moody St. 



Wa. 5-1256 



1036 Lexington St. 

(Cor. Trapelo Rd.) 

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Compliments of 

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580 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANDERSON'S FLORISTS 

196 MOODY STREET 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Tel. Waltham 5-1843 

Compliments of 

PAUL'S LUNCH 

MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM 54, MASS. 



* 



§ 



Y,0~><^r*-Cr*~Cr- 






95 



Congratulations and Very Best Wishes 
To Every Member of the Graduating Class of 1954. 



> § 

§ 



May each of you achieve higher education 
and enjoy nothing but success, good health 
and good fortune in the years that lie ahead. 



Louis J. Kirsch, Jr. 









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96 



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Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

KNITTING CLUB 

OF 

WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH 



Compliments 
of 

SWANSON'S WALTHAM 
EXPRESS 



Compliments of 

MOODY SPA 

811 MOODY STREET 
Open from 6 a.m. — to — 1 1 : 30 p.m. 



Compliments of 

COMMERCIAL CLUB 

OF 

WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH 



THE TUX SHOP 

Complete line of 
Men's Formal Wear for Rental 

KEVIN HUGHES — FLOYD HAMILTON 

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Telephone LAsell 7-0459 



Frigidaire - Ranges - Water Heaters - Ironers 
Refrigerators 

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HOUSE OF SPORTS, INC. 

Sporting Goods, Cameras 
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831 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Tel. Wa. 5-0530 

Compliments of 

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102 FELTON STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 



THOMAS A. JOYCE 



135 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

LAKEVIEW VARIETY 

174 LAKE STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Compliments of 

MILLER OIL COMPANY 

69 RIVER STREET 
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WALTHAM COAL COMPANY 

691 MAIN STREET 
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Compliments of 

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465 MAIN STREET 

Tel Wa. 5-4683 

Swedish Paslries, Wedding Cakes, Birthday 
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NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 
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Registration 

Early in September 

You are cordially invited to visit the University 
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•CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 



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FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
Director of Admissions 
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Please send me the following catalog. 

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WALTHAM ELECTRIC 

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875A MAIN STREET 

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ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

Wa. 5-3628 Res. Wa. 5-0642-W 



HARVARD DRUG CO. 

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James Weiner, Ph.G., Reg. Pharm. 

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830 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



STERLING JEWELERS 

312 MOODY STREET 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 
for 
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COLBERT'S MENS' SHOP 

889A MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Sport wear — Work Clothes 



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Lingerie 

Tel. Wa. 5-2170 

393 MOODY STREET 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



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1101 MAIN STREET 

Tel. Wa. 5-7200 

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584 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Tel. Wa. 5-2931 

Compliments of 

MOODY STATIONERY 

MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



§ 






Compliments of 

CRESCENT FOODLAND 

291 CRESCENT STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



RONDEAU MACHINE 

and 

TOOL COMPANY 

ELECTRO MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT 

121 FELTON STREET 

Tel. Wa. 5-6992 



Compliments of 



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275 LEXINGTON STREET 



WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 



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469 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 



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MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



Tel. Wa. 5 -0870- W 



Compliments 
of 

WALTHAM CITIZENS 
NATIONAL BANK 



FRANK H. DEMEO, INC. 

Furniture — Bedding 
Rugs — Carpets — Linoleum 

623 MOODY STREET (At Ash St.) 

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182 NEWTON STREET 

WALTHAM 54, MASS. 

Telephone Waltham 5-4639 






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101 






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girls finishing High School — 

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102 



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THOMAS F. NOLAN 



Plumbing and Heating 
Paints — Oils — Varnishes 



6 OAK STREET 



WALTHAM 54, MASS. 



Telephone Waltham 5-0013 — 5-0893 



Compliments of 



DRAMA CLUB 

OF 

WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH 



Compliments of 



SCOTT AND DOUGLAS 
SCHOOL OF DANCING 



WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Tel. Wa. 5-0542 



Compliments 



WEST END 
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866-870 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

24 Hour Towing — Wa. 5-7400 



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103 



9 § 



h 

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RUSSO ART STUDIOS 



Est. 1900 



COMMERCIAL AND PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHERS 



The privilege of caring for your requirements 
photographically will be our pleasure. 



353 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



Tel. Waltham 5-4881 






§ 



104 



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WALTHAMS 



Oldest 



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Established 1872 



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Real Estate 



Insurance 



Tel. Wa. 5-2189 



"Congratulations and Best 
Wishes To All 

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1954' 



FROM THE 



MEMBERS OF ROOM 109 



LINCOLN 



MERCURY 



I 






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§ 
* 

§ 



! 



Sales & Service 

HOLMES MOTORS 
INCORPORATED 

922 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Tel. Wa. 5-7090 



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105 








Compliments of 




CITY RANGE & 




FUEL OIL CO. 


Compliments 


210 LEXINGTON STREET 


of 


WALTHAM 54, MASS. 


ROBERT B. JOHNSON CO. 


Compliments of 

JOSEPH A. POULIOT 




Movers 




Packers 




Storage 
Local and Long Distance 




57 FULLER STREET 




Tel. Wa. 5-2428 






§ 

§ JOSEPH A. POULIOT | 

y Movers § 

§ Packers & 

§ Storage \ 

£ Local and Long Distance r 

§ 



ACME ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY 

Excavating Trench Digging — Gravel, Fill, Loam and Sand 



Shoveldozer 
20 SARTELL ROAD 



Backhoe 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



Telephone Waltham 5-8820 or Waltham 5-1763-J 



LOUIS MARINELLI 



Class of '49 









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106 



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Compliments of 


Compliments of 


NICKERSON & HILLS 


UNIVERSITY SHOE REPAIR 


MAIN STREET 


903 MAIN STREET 


WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 


WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 




WALTHAM PHARMACY CO. 


Compliments 
of 


INC. 




757 MOODY STREET 


WATCH CITY 




RED CAB SERVICE 


WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 




Phone Wa. 5-7980 and Wa. 5-7981 



WALTHAM SAVINGS BANK 



YOUR SCHOOL SAVINGS BANK 



101 Years of Service 



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107 






MORGAN ART STORE 



443 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 54, MASS. 



MIDDLESEX SUPPLY COMPANY § 



621 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 54, MASS. 



§ 









$ 



§ 



Compliments of 



WALTHAM FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



715 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 54, MASSACHUSETTS 








Compliments of 


Compliments 




of 


KAY JEWELERS 


PETER J. CONNELLY 


389 MOODY STREET 




WALTHAM 54, MASS. 






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108 






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IT'S ONLY GOOD SENSE 
TO BE GOOD NEIGHBORS 



§ 



■*A9 



President Abraham Lincoln once said, "Just as 1 would not be a slave, so 
I must not be a master. This is the essence of democracy." 

His immortal words simply declared his belief in the Golden Rule. 

A company, in order to be successful, must live in a community of good 
friends and neighbors. To achieve this, the company itself must be a good friend 
and neighbor. This, too, is the Golden Rule in action . . . and it is the essence of 
democracy." 



\ 



RAYTHEON MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

Waltham 54, Mass. 



i 



RAYTHEON 



Excellence in Electronics 



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109 



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§ 

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§ 



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PATRONS 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter E. Ohnemus, Sr. 

Miss Marguerite Ohnemus 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Pendergast, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis J. Kirsch, Jr. 

Mr. David T. Gustafson 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Campion 

Mr. Walter Walsh 

Mr. Willard Smyth 

Mr. & Mrs. Willard O. Jackson 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Carpentino 

Mr. & Mrs. Veron Gates 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Brinn 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Barclay 

Mr. & Mrs. Nils E. Nelson 

Mr. & Mrs. George Centola 

Miss Clair Carpentino 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Card 

Mr. & Mrs. Nevin Brynning 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas S. Collins 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Fanara 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter LeFort 

Mr. Ronald Boucher 

Mr. Tin Foo Lee 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Bond 

Mrs. G. W. Dangelmeyer 

Mr. Paul Mogan 

Mr. Peter Bourque 

Miss Eleanor J. Tahaney 









110 






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direct sales 



•SI 

PI 



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5 



retouching 



personal service 

O 

original layouts 
art service 



|\H 




composition 
mechanicals 



halftone and line negative 



film and plate stripping 



eqatives 



plate making 



offset printing 



folding 
complete bindery service 
packaging 
delivery 







f. o'toole and sons, inc. 




INTERS 



Stamford, Connecticut 



Stamford 4-9226 
new york me 5-4112 



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§ 



§ 



Compliments of 



§ 



§ 



§ 



DAVID PHIPPS STUDIO 



\ 



PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR THREE GENERATIONS 



§ 



§ 






£! 






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87 3 A MAIN STREET 



WAltham 5-3431 



WAltham 5-4697 






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